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How B2B businesses are going digital during the coronavirus pandemic

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As marketers, we’ve been conditioned to be prepared for any changes or disruptions that come our way. Being in such a fast-moving industry, we have no choice but to be proactive and embrace the pace.

The unfortunate spread of the coronavirus is no exception, and marketers everywhere are starting to review their strategies in an effort to adapt and overcome.

One of the most impactful effects the coronavirus pandemic has had on businesses is the forced cancellation or postponement of large in-person events.

Tradeshows, conferences, festivals, sporting events, and concerts have all had to either reschedule or cancel completely. (Which means no, I’m not going to the Daughtry concert this week.)

PredictHQ revealed that in February alone, concerns about the coronavirus led to a 500% surge in cancellations and postponements. Most notably, Mobile World Congress (MWC), which was set to take place February 24th – 27th in Barcelona, was canceled due to concerns over the virus.

The number of events to be canceled this month is expected to be even higher than that, with the cost of cancellations estimated at billions of dollars.

We at IMPACT even had to postpone our own event, Digital Sales & Marketing World, which was originally supposed to take place in Hartford, CT, from April 5th – April 7th.

As a result, it will now be hosted from November 30th – December 2nd.

What’s happening to organizations’ marketing budgets?

A lot of businesses still rely heavily on tradeshows and traditional marketing that requires people to be in-person; for some, that’s where the largest chunk of their marketing budget is applied.

Because of this, some B2B organizations are cutting back on their marketing budget.

According to Michael Nathanson, an analyst at MoffettNathanson, with companies widely expected to slash marketing budgets, the ad industry could see nearly $26 billion in lost revenue, or a 10.6% decline.

Amidst this shift are companies reallocating their marketing budget to digital efforts.

For the companies that are going digital, they’re quickly realizing that because they spend so much money on traditional marketing or advertising, they now have a large amount to spend elsewhere.

Even if they put a portion of that budget to online efforts, they’re likely to see productive growth of their web presence, especially if they’re quicker to react than their competitors.

By capitalizing on their current digital efforts or — for some — finally making the move to a more modern-day marketing style, companies can not only continue to push through the hard times and stay relevant, but they can also measure the success of their work.

Reporting on your return on investment (ROI) is something that is harder to do with traditional marketing. By using digital methods, you can gain more insight into metrics like unique monthly visitors, cost per acquisition, return on ad spend, cost per lead, and more.

And, if you’re an organization that has been embracing digital tactics for a while, now could be a great time to review and potentially refocus your strategy to adapt to the current events taking place.

5 tips to get the most out of your digital strategy during the pandemic

If you’re wondering what you can do or how you can pivot to keep your organization afloat and maintain your competitive edge, you’re not alone.

Many companies across the world (including IMPACT) have buckled down and started to come up with creative ways to break through the noise and remain a leader in their industry through digital outlets.

1. Host an online event or webinar

If your organization had an event that was affected by the outbreak, that doesn’t mean you can’t get people together and still deliver the value they were looking forward to.

At IMPACT, we took Digital Sales & Marketing World’s postponement as an opportunity to introduce Digital Sales & Marketing Day, a full-day virtual conference taking place on April 6th.

We’ll be talking about how sales and marketing leaders can future-proof their businesses with a customer-focused, budget-conscious sales and marketing strategy. (Interested? You can register here.)

Even if you weren’t planning an in-person event, hosting an online webinar or interactive workshop can prove to be extremely helpful and beneficial for your audience in tough times like these.

2. Optimize your website content for users and search engines

Because recent buying behaviors have been forced to change, the way people are searching for things online may also have changed.

Ensure you’re staying up to speed on the most highly searched keywords relevant to your product or service, and brainstorm ways that you can tweak your website content to align.

Also, make sure that your calls-to-action still make sense as the best next step for the user to take.

3. Create content pieces around what’s happening

In addition to optimizing your current content, it’s important that you also create unique pieces around newly targeted search queries. In a time like this, consumers are looking to learn as much as they can about how coronavirus might be affecting their everyday routines and business plans.

Use this as an opportunity to generate new ideas for blog posts or put together a weekly newsletter for your prospects and customers to show them you’re just as concerned as they are, and as a result, you’re going to keep them updated on everything important.

If it makes sense, you can also write a press release to inform the media and a broader audience on a specific topic of importance.

4. Engage with your audience on social media

Did you know that 79% of the population in the United States has at least one social media profile, and 62% of adults use social media to catch up on trending news?

As you begin creating new content or decide to host an online event or webinar to engage with your audience, sharing this material on your social media platforms can have a huge effect on your digital reach.

5. Dive into video

Video content has boomed in the last couple years, and creating a video right from your computer is easier than ever.

According to IMPACT’s Director of Video Strategy Zach Basner, “video is the only type of content that allows people to see us, to hear us, and to know us. This is why video makes a difference.”

Because of the more personal feel that video offers, it can be used in a multitude of ways as more companies begin to embrace the remote culture.

If you can’t meet for an in-person sales dinner, meet over a Zoom call. If you’re not able to have that in-person team meeting, use Skype to make sure everyone feels included and productive. Or, if you need to get a one-on-one message out to a team member or a client, try Vidyard’s GoVideo feature.

Video can also be used to replace or supplement written content that you share on your website and social media platforms. Considering 78% of people watch online videos every week, and 55% view online videos every day, why would you not incorporate video into your marketing strategy?

Get the most out of your digital marketing efforts

Knowing all that’s happened and will happen, it’s extremely important that your business is quick to adapt and overcome any obstacles.

If you’ve been given the opportunity to reallocate your marketing budget, consider getting ahead of your competitors and implementing more digital tactics like online webinars, live or recorded video content, and written content that matches what your audience is searching for.

In the end, any amount of time spent on strategizing and optimizing your digital strategy will be fruitful, as the overall results you accrue will far outlast the coronavirus.





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Operating During COVID-19: Helpful Tips for Local Businesses

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Posted by MiriamEllis

Local businesses know better than any other model what it means to fully participate in community life. You are the good neighbors who are there to serve, inspire, and sustain the people and traditions that make your town a unique and enjoyable place to call home.

As we explore this topic of what local businesses can do during the COVID-19 pandemic, I want to honor all that you have always done to take care of your community as a local business owner or marketer. Thank you.

In this article, you will find local SEO tips that could make a difference for your business in the coming weeks, innovative resources for support, advice from my own tight-knit community of some of the world’s best local SEOs, and some serious thinking about building a better local future.

Adhere to all regulations

First and foremost, start each day with a review of both local and national news to be sure you are complying with the evolving regulations for your city, county, and country. Policies designed to mitigate the harm of COVID-19 vary widely from region to region, and your business must keep informed of which forms of service you are allowed to offer in this dynamic scenario.

And, while social media can be a great connector within your community at any time, beware of misinformation and, sadly, scams in the days ahead. Get your news from sources you trust, and if you are not certain about interpreting a guideline, directly contact local authorities. This article does not take the place of laws and regulations specific to your community.

Communicate abundantly

The most helpful thing any local business can do right now, whether it’s deemed an essential or non-essential service, is to provide accurate information to its community. There are three key places to do this:

Google My Business

“More than ever, your Google Business Profile is a critical communication nexus with your customers”. —Mike Blumenthal, GatherUp

Local businesses know just how big a role Google plays as intermediary between brands and the public. This remains true during this difficult time however, Google’s local product is not running at full strength. Joy Hawkins’ article for Local University on March 23 details the limited support for or complete discontinuation of Google Q&As, posts, descriptions, reviews, and owner responses. It’s an evolving scenario, with local SEOs reporting different outcomes each day. For example, some practitioners have been able to get some, but not all, Google posts to publish.

As of writing this, there are four fields you can utilize to communicate current information to customers via GMB, but please be aware that some edits may take several days to go into effect:

Name

Google is allowing businesses to edit their business name field to reflect that they are offering curbside service, takeout, and delivery. For example, if your current name is “John’s Grill”, you are allowed to temporarily change your name to “John’s Grill — Delivery Available”.

Phone number

If regulations are keeping you at home but you still want customers to be able to reach you on your home or cell phone for information, update your work answering machine to reflect the changes and edit your GMB phone number to the appropriate new number.

Hours of operation

The discussion on how best to show that your business either has no hours or limited new hours is ongoing. I believe the best route for the present is to use Google’s method of setting special hours. This option should be especially useful for multi-location enterprises who can set special hours via the API.

Be advised, however, that there are some instances of agencies setting special hours for clients and then clients receiving emails from Google asking if the business has closed. This can alarm those clients. However, to date, it appears that when Google receives responses to this prompt that yes, the business is closed, they simply put a message about this on the listing rather than remove the listing entirely.

On March 25, Google implemented a “temporarily closed” button inside the “Info” tab of the GMB dashboard, as reported by Joy Hawkins. Utilizing this button may temporarily decrease your rankings, but you will be able to remove the label in the future and I strongly hope (but cannot guarantee) that this will remove any effects of suppression. I recommend using this button if it applies to your business because we must put safety first over any other consideration.

COVID-19 update posts

Google has newly created a Google posts type that you’ll see as an option in your GMB dashboard. While other post types have been published sporadically, I am seeing examples of the COVID-19 Update posts going live. Try to fit as much information as you can about the changed status of your business into one of these posts.

In addition to the edits you make to your GMB listing, update your most visible local business listings on other platforms to the best of your ability, including on:

  • Bing: A “Temporarily closed” business status is available in the Bing Places dashboard. This is currently not available in the API.
  • Yelp: Yelp has introduced a new field called “temporarily closed”. This is meant to be used by businesses which are or will be closed (but not on a permanent basis) due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Businesses need to indicate the “end date” for when this business status will end. Given the uncertainty surrounding timelines, Yelp is allowing users to provide an “estimate” for the end date which they can always update later. Special opening hours can be added on Yelp itself, too. Neither field is available in the API.

Website

Google My Business may be experiencing support issues right now, but thank goodness you still have full control of your website as a home base for conveying important information to the public. Here’s a quick checklist of suggested items to update on your site as soon as you can:

  • Put a site wide banner on all pages of the website with key information such as “temporarily closed”, “drive-up service available 9-5 Monday – Friday” or “storefront closed but we can still ship to you.”
  • Provide the most complete information about how your business has been affected by COVID-19, and detail any services that remain available to customers.
  • Edit location landing pages in bulk or individually to reflect closures, new hours, and new temporary offers.
  • Be sure hours of operation are accurate everywhere they are mentioned on the website, including the homepage, contact page, about page, and landing pages.
  • If your main contact phone number has changed due to the situation, update that number everywhere it exists on the website. Don’t overlook headers, footers, or sidebars as places your contact info may be.
  • If you have a blog, use it to keep the public updated about the availability of products and services.
  • Be sure your website contains highly visible links to any social media platforms you are using to provide updated information.
  • It would be a worthy public service right now to create new content about local resources in your community for all kinds of basic needs.

Social media and email

“Make it clear what you’re doing, such as things like home delivery or curbside pickup. And mention it EVERYWHERE. The companies that are being successful with this are telling people non-stop how they can still support them. Additionally, don’t be afraid to reach out to people who have supported you via social media in the past and ask them to mention what you’re doing.” —Dana DiTomaso, Kick Point

Whether your customers’ social community is Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, or another platform, there has never been a more vital time to make use of the instant communication these sites provide. It was Fred Rogers who famously said that in times of crisis, we should “look for the helpers.” People will be looking to your brand for help and, also, seeking ways that they can help, too.

If you can make the time to utilize social media to highlight not just your own services, but the services you discover are being provided by other businesses in your city, you will be strengthening your community. Ask your followers and customers to amplify information that can make life safer or better right now.

And, of course, email is one of the best tools presently at your disposal to message your entire base about changed conditions and special offers. My best practice advice for the present is to be sure you’re only communicating what is truly necessary. I’ve seen some examples of brands (which shall remain nameless) exploiting COVID-19 for senseless self-promotion instead of putting customers’ concerns and needs first. Don’t go that route. Be a helper!

Beyond your local business listing, websites, social media platforms, and email, don’t overlook offline media for making further, helpful informational contributions. Call into local radio shows and get in touch with local newspapers if you have facts or offers that can help the public.

Operate as fully as you can

“Find out what support is being made available for you at [the] government level, tap into this as soon as you can — it’s likely there will be a lot of paperwork and many hoops through which you’ll need to jump.” —Claire Carlile, Claire Carlile Marketing

While the social safety net differs widely from country to country, research any offers of support being made to your business and make use of them to remain as operational as possible for the duration of this pandemic. Here are six adjustments your business should carefully consider to determine whether implementation is possible:

1. Fulfill essentials

If your business meets local, state, or federal regulations that enable it to continue operating because it’s deemed “essential”, here are the ways different business models are adapting to current conditions:

  • Some healthcare appointments can be handled via phone or virtual meetings, and some medical facilities are offering drive-up testing.
  • Drivethrough, delivery, and curbside pickup are enabling some brands to offer takeout meals, groceries, prescriptions, and other necessary goods to customers.
  • Supermarkets and grocery stores without built-in delivery fleets are contracting with third parties for this service.
  • Farms and ranches can offer honor system roadside stands to allow customers to access fresh produce, dairy products, and meats with proper social distancing.
  • Companies that care for vulnerable populations, banking, laundry, and fuel can implement and communicate the extra steps they are taking to adhere to sanitation guidelines for the safety of customers and staff.
  • Brands and organizations that donate goods and services to fulfill essential needs are taking an active role in community support, too.

2. Evaluate e-commerce

If your local business already has an e-commerce component on its website, you’re many steps ahead in being well set up to keep selling via delivery. If you’ve not yet implemented any form of online selling, investigate the following options:

  • If you have a credit card processing machine, the most basic solution is to take orders over the phone and then ship them, allow curbside pickup, or deliver them.
  • If you lack a credit card processing service, PayPal invoicing can work in a pinch.
  • If your site is built on WordPress and you’re quite comfortable with that platform, Moz’s own Sha Menz highly recommends the ease of the WooCommerce plugin for getting online shopping set up with PayPal as a built-in payment option. It allows easy setup of flat rate or free shipping and local pickup options. WooCommerce automatically sends order confirmation emails to both owner and customer and even supports creation of discount coupons.
  • Pointy is a simple device that lets you scan product barcodes and have them catalogued online. Read my 2019 interview with the company’s CEO and determine whether Pointy plus shipping could be a solution to keep you in business in the coming months.
  • If you’ve determined that robust investing in e-commerce is a wise move for the present and future, I found this 2020 overview of options from Shopify to Volusion to Magento very useful. Don’t overlook the Moz blog’s e-commerce category for free, expert advice.

3. Connect virtually

In my very large family, one relative has transitioned her yoga studio to online classes, another is offering secure online psychotherapy appointments, and another is instructing his orchestra on the web. While nothing can replace in-person relationships, virtual meetings are the next-best-thing and could keep many business models operating at a significant level, despite the pandemic. Check out these resources:

4. Use downtime for education

If COVID-19 has somewhat or completely paused your business, it’s my strong hope that there will be better days ahead for you. If, like so many people, you find yourself with much more time on your hands than usual, consider using it to come out of this period of crisis with new business knowledge. Please make use of this list of resources, and I want to give special thanks to my friend, Claire Carlile, for contributing several of these suggestions:

Begin working towards a stronger local future

“I would say generally it’s critical for business owners to connect with one another. To the extent they can join or form groups for support or to share ideas, they should. This is a terrible and scary time but there are also potential opportunities that may emerge with creative thinking. The ‘silver lining’, if there is one here, is the opportunity to reexamine business processes, try new things and think — out of necessity — very creatively about how to move forward. Employees are also a great source of ideas and inspiration.” —Greg Sterling, Search Engine Land

I’d like to close with some positive thinking. Local SEO isn’t just a career for me — it’s a personal belief system that well-resourced communities are the strongest. Every community, town, and city shares roughly the same needs, which we might depict like this:

In this simple chart, we see the framework of a functional, prepared, and healthy society. We see a plan for covering the basic needs of human existence, the cooperation required to run a stable community, contributive roles everyone can play to support life and culture, and relief from inevitable disasters. We see regenerative land and water stewardship, an abundance of skilled educators, medical professionals, artisans, and a peaceful platform for full human expression.

COVID-19 marks the third major disaster my community has lived through in three years. The pandemic and California’s wildfires have taught me to think about the areas in which my county is self-sustaining, and areas in which we are unprepared to take care of one another in both good times and bad. While state and national governments bear a serious responsibility for the well-being of citizens, my genuine belief as a local SEO is that local communities should be doing all they can to self-fulfill as many data points on the chart above as possible.

While it’s said that necessity is the mother of invention, and it certainly makes sense that the present moment would be driving us to invent new solutions to keep our communities safe and well, I find models for sane growth in the work others have already contributed. For me, these are sources of serious inspiration:

  • Learn from indigenous cultures around the world about stewardship and community. Here is just one example of how knowledge is being applied by tribes in the Pacific Northwest during the pandemic. In my own state of California, a number of tribes are leading the way in mitigating wildfires via cultural burning, addressing what has become an annual disaster where I live.
  • Look at the policies of other countries with a higher index of human happiness than my own. For example, I am a great admirer of Norway’s law of allemannsrett which permits all residents to responsibly roam and camp in most of the country, and more importantly, to harvest natural foods like mushrooms and berries. In my community, most land is behind fences, and even though I know which plants are edible, I can’t access most of them. Given current grocery store shortages, this concept deserves local re-thinking.
  • Study the Economic Bill of Rights US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt introduced but didn’t live to see passed. Had this been implemented, my local community would not now be suffering from a shortage of medical providers and denial of medical care, a shortage of nearby farms for complete nutrition, homelessness and unaffordable housing, and a widespread lack of education and essential skills. From a purely commercial standpoint, FDR’s bill could also have prevented the collapse of “Main St.”, which local search marketers have been fighting every day to reverse.
  • Join organizations like the American Independent Local Business Alliance which exist to build more resilient local communities via methods like the Buy Local movement and community education. I strongly encourage you to check in with AMIBA for guidance in these times.

Other models and examples may personally inspire you, but I share my friend Greg Sterling’s opinion: now is the time to bring creativity to bear, to connect with fellow local business owners and community members, and to begin planning a more realistic and livable future.

For now, you will have to make those connections virtually, but the goal is to come out of this time of crisis with a determination to make local living more sustainable for everyone. You can start with asking very basic questions like: Where is the nearest farm, and how many people can it feed? What do we need to do to attract more doctors and nurses to this town? Which facilities could be converted here to produce soap, or bathroom tissue, or medical supplies?

I don’t want to downplay the challenge of forward-thinking in a time of disruption, but this I know from being a gardener: new seeds sprout best where the earth is disturbed. You have only to visit the margins of new roads being laid to see how digging is quickly followed by verdant crops of fresh seedlings. Humanity needs to dig deep right now for its best solutions to serious challenges, and this can begin right where you are, locally.

Please allow me to wish many better days ahead to you, your business, and your community, and to work by your side to build a stronger local future.

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How 5 Brands Use WhatsApp For Marketing

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In 2019, WhatsApp reached 2 billion global users and solidified itself as the most popular mobile messaging app worldwide.

When the app launched in 2009, it was just a basic SMS platform that allowed you to log on, text message friends, send photos or videos, and make voice calls globally using Wi-Fi. The app became popular as an alternative to paying costly phone bills to communicate with loved ones around the world.

As one of WhatsApp’s earlier adopters, I discovered the app when studying abroad in Ireland.

After blowing up my U.S. cell phone bill with roaming fees and spending countless euros just to text my roommate on pay-as-you-go Irish phone, my classmates told me to download WhatsApp. Almost instantly, I was able to call my parents and connect with friends in the U.S. and Ireland. I never needed to use my junky temporary phone again.

After using WhatsApp for a few months, it was pretty apparent that this simple Wi-Fi fueled tool was going to be a big innovation in the telecommunication industry.

A few years after my trip abroad, WhatsApp became even more well known when it was acquired by Facebook in 2014. Since then, WhatsApp’s evolved from an SMS tool to a full platform of features. It’s also gained major attention from brands.

Most recently, in 2018, the app innovated even further by adding a group chat option and group video calls. With these features, companies like British Vogue could build group chats filled with prospects and send content or offers to them. Meanwhile, other brands have leveraged WhatsAp as a channel where customers or prospects can contact them with questions about a product.

Aside from WhatsApp’s large user base and brand-friendly features, the app’s also become intriguing to companies because of how it’s pulled in users from all around the world. While the app was created in the United States and is popular throughout North America, the two countries with the most users are actually India and Brazil.

Because of its global audience, brands that are looking to market internationally are able to leverage WhatsApp, as well as global social networks, and paid advertising campaigns.

But, despite WhatsApp’s global opportunities, the platform still presents a few challenges for brands.Early Challenges of WhatsApp

Prior to 2019, WhatsApp’s format was designed to keep people’s contact information private so that random accounts can’t easily find and message them. It was not initially designed for business usage. Because of this, neither you or your brand could create public accounts that users can easily search for.

Because WhatsApp required you to know someone’s contact information, brands similarly couldn’t use the network to find, add, and contact prospects that might have been interested in their product. Alternatively, the companies would need to get WhatsApp information directly from the prospect or a contact list they already had or add them.

Another issue with WhatsApp was that you couldn’t publish content publically. While Facebook or other platforms allowed you to post content to audiences on feeds or a profile, you had to create a group of WhatsApp contacts and post links there.

But, things are changing for brands on WhatsApp.

WhatsApp’s Growing Business Opportunities

Recently, WhatsApp and Facebook announced the launch of WhatsApp for Business, an app that allows companies to create an account with company information, allow contacts to text or call them, and monitor app-related insights.

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WhatsApp for Business, which has gained over 5 million users since its 2019 launch, also enables companies to build and share product catalogs, which highlight current offerings and can link to ecommerce sites. Once a business creates a catalog, its marketing team can share its link on the brand’s profile or in chats with prospects. Here’s a quick demo of how the catalog tool works:

 

 

Additionally, even though connecting with broad international targets was challenging at first on WhatsApp, some companies say the smaller groups they’ve interacted with on were more engaged than larger social audiences. This could be because a person who gives a company their contact information or is willing to add a company’s contact to might be incredibly interested in learning about that brand from the start.

Aside from WhatsApp’s engagement and branding opportunities, Facebook’s ownership of the platform also benefits advertisers. Recent findings reveal that branded ad targeting has resulted in more ROI due to data sharing between WhatsApp and Facebook.

Although Facebook plans to integrate WhatsApp and Instagram into its own flagship platform, CEO Mark Zuckerberg says WhatsApp will remain a standalone app that benefits from Facebook’s app ecosystem.

Because WhatsApp is a growing app that probably won’t get discontinued any time soon, businesses of all sizes are continuing to experiment with it. Top Industries on WhatsApp

Most recently, two specific industries that are flocking to WhatsApp are publishing and fashion. Meanwhile, food and beverage companies like Absolut Vodka also leverage the platform for marketing.

If you’re similarly aiming to target global audiences, a WhatsApp strategy could be worth considering now or in the future. But, if you’re new to the platform, you might need some inspiration to learn more about what makes a mobile messaging app’s strategy successful.

To help you plan your first experiment, here are a few of the best WhatsApp tactics that marketers can learn from.

How 5 Brands Are Using WhatsApp

Adidas: “100% Unfair Pred”

Adidas has been using WhatsApp since 2015 to answer questions about their products and promote new items to prospects. But recently, they launched a campaign that combined live chats and influencer marketing.

In 2019, after realizing that athletic teams used WhatsApp to send team-wide communications or announcements, Adidas offered to help recreational sports players “rent” a professional athlete — or “predator” — for one of their upcoming games.

In a WhatsApp Group temporarily opened by Adidas, the company shared that they wanted to help one uncoordinated recreational sports team win a single game by “renting” them a professional athlete. From there, recreational athletes and coaches were asked to send WhatsApp messages noting the sport they play, when their next game was, and why they needed to borrow a professional athlete to win.

Days later, Adidas sent a direct message to the winning recreational athlete. The “pred” then showed up to the recreational game dressed in Adidas sportswear.

“We know our audience use it to share fixture info, team selection — and team-mates messaging to find last-minute replacements,” Adidas’ Managing Editor Laura Coveney told Digiday.

“WhatsApp was perfect for the more functional elements of the ‘Rent-a-Pred’ hotline as it allowed consumers to share private information one-to-one with us for review, before being allocated a Predator player near them,” Coveney explained.

The Financial Times Shares Free Content

Think an age-old publication known for long-form content can’t succeed on an instant-messaging app? Think again.

In late 2019, the Financial Times, a subscriber-only publication, posted two free daily articles in its WhatsApp Group. According to Digiday, the tactic of sharing content has given them more conversions than other social platforms, more brand awareness, and insight into what topics are important to their potential subscribers.

Interestingly, the publication discovered that although its audience was much smaller, it was more engaged with the content and more likely to subscribe than audiences on other online platforms.

For example, people who clicked a Financial Times link on WhatsApp were 40% more likely to return to the site within three days than those who clicked their links on other channels. The publication also found that traffic gained from WhatsApp was similar to what it received from its average Twitter post.

“People liked the convenience of having [news] come through to their phone, pushed to them where they are, without having to go to our site, on a service they are already signed up to,” said the Times’ Audience Engagement Editor, Alana Coates, in an interview.

Absolut Vodka Launch Party Campaign

One of WhatsApp’s earliest success stories came from the Swedish liquor company Absolut Vodka. When marketing the launch of its Absolut Unique vodka product in 2013, Absolut struggled with driving global audiences and was tightly competing with other liquor companies that had many more years of history supporting them.

Unlike many other alcoholic beverage companies, Absolut didn’t have a story of long-running success behind its brand just yet. While some liquor companies could easily market how they’d been using the same recipes for hundreds of years, Absolut was only established in 1979.

Nostalgic content, such as this ad from Jim Beam, allows older brands to tell a story about their successful history, while emotionally connecting with their audiences. This was something that a young company, like Absolut, couldn’t play up as a marketing tactic.

Instead of inventing a story that spoke to audiences of all ages, Absolut decided to leverage WhatsApp’s messaging system to earn credibility and awareness from younger audiences globally.

To mark the Argentinian launch of Absolut Unique, the beverage company promoted a contest where you could win two tickets to a celebration of the new product in Argentina. To enter the tickets, you had to go on WhatsApp and message the account of a doorman named Sven to convince him why you deserved to attend the party.

According to a case study, 600 Argentinian users contacted Sven over the course of three days. The campaign was also widely discussed locally which helped Absolut gain brand awareness even from people who didn’t contact the account.

Although Absolut is now a giant, well-known company, this is a great example of how the brand recognized and leveraged WhatsApp as a platform that could be used to boost local brand awareness and sales in another part of the world.

Hellmann’s: “WhatsCook”

Back in 2014, Hellmann’s, a U.S.-based Mayonnaise company, wanted to reach audiences in Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and Paraguay. To do this, they hired a team of professional chefs to help them with a WhatsApp campaign.

WhatsCook camapgin on whatsapp

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WhatsCook camapgin on whatsapp

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According to Cubo, an agency that assisted with this campaign, 13,000 people signed up for the service and the average participant interacted with a chef for 65 minutes.

With the “WhatsCook” campaign, Hellmann’s leveraged industry experts as a way to get in contact with fans. The company already knew that people who bought its mayo wanted to use it. But, they also knew that people might not know many mayonnaise-friendly recipes. With this strategy, the brand engaged with people who love to cook and solved for the customer by showing them how to use Hellmann’s main product in different ways.

Yoox Personal Shoppers

Yoox whatsapp campaign

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Yoox whatsapp campaign

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During Yoox’s WhatsApp experiment, they made $80,000 off of sales through the app.

This is a great example of how a company leveraged WhatsApp to reach interested prospects, ease them through the buyer’s journey with a highly interactive messaging experience, and successfully make sales without having customers enter a store.

Navigating Mobile Messaging

As seen above, WhatsApp can help brands to nurture interesting prospects into leads. At the moment, you can’t send a message to the entire social platform, but you can send links and engage with contacts that have already shown interest in your brand.

While all of the examples are fairly different, they all emphasize how interactive and highly personalized mobile messaging techniques can be beneficial to marketing.

If you’re planning to test out a WhatsApp experience, keep these tactics in mind:

Interested in learning more about messaging app strategies? Check out this blog post that compares WhatsApp, Snapchat, and Kik.





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Top 15 Kansas News Websites To Follow in 2020 (US State)

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Top 15 Kansas News Websites
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Kansas News Websites

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1. KAKE – News

Wichita, Kansas, United States About Website Follow KAKE News to get the latest breaking news, weather alerts, sports and the topics that impact you. Frequency 16 posts / day Website kake.com/category/310963/news
Facebook fans 246.4K ⋅ Twitter followers 126.3K ⋅ Instagram Followers 29.9K ⋅ Social Engagement 5.6K ⋅ Domain Authority 69 ⋅ Alexa Rank 51K

2. KSN-TV

KSN-TVWichita, Kansas, United States About Website KSN News gives up to date information, latest news, sports, community, and weather updates. Frequency 30 posts / day Website ksn.com
Facebook fans 129.2K ⋅ Twitter followers 76.5K ⋅ Instagram Followers 5.2K ⋅ Social Engagement 77 ⋅ Domain Authority 71 ⋅ Alexa Rank 107.4K

3. The Wichita Eagle – News

The Wichita Eagle - NewsWichita, Kansas, United States About Website The Wichita Eagle is the leading and essential source for news, information, opinion columns, videos and community events in south-central Kansas. Frequency 30 posts / day Website kansas.com/news
Facebook fans 112.3K ⋅ Twitter followers 64.4K ⋅ Social Engagement 63 ⋅ Domain Authority 79 ⋅ Alexa Rank 80.3K

4. KSNT News

KSNT NewsTopeka, Kansas, United States About Website Follow KSNT News for local Topeka and Northeast Kansas news, weather stories, sports, community and more. Frequency 30 posts / day Website ksnt.com
Facebook fans 138.8K ⋅ Twitter followers 12.6K ⋅ Instagram Followers 3 ⋅ Social Engagement 619 ⋅ Domain Authority 68 ⋅ Alexa Rank 282K

5. The Hutchinson News

The Hutchinson NewsHutchinson, Kansas, United States About Website The Hutchinson News provides the latest news, information and opinion about communities in Hutchinson, Kansas. Frequency 28 posts / day Website hutchnews.com/news
Facebook fans 27.8K ⋅ Twitter followers 8.7K ⋅ Social Engagement 19 ⋅ Domain Authority 70 ⋅ Alexa Rank 399.9K

6. Salina Journal – News

Salina Journal - NewsSalina, Kansas, United States About Website The Salina Journal offers daily news coverage of local news, sports, arts and entertainment for Salina and North Central Kansas. Frequency 25 posts / day Website salina.com/news
Facebook fans 15.2K ⋅ Twitter followers 6.4K ⋅ Domain Authority 62 ⋅ Alexa Rank 876.8K

7. The Hays Daily News

The Hays Daily NewsHays, Kansas, United States About Website The Hays Daily News delivers up-to-the-minute news and information on the latest top stories, weather, entertainment, politics and more. Frequency 20 posts / day Website hdnews.net/news
Facebook fans 14.1K ⋅ Twitter followers 5.4K ⋅ Domain Authority 57 ⋅ Alexa Rank 975.1K

8. The Manhattan Mercury

The Manhattan MercuryManhattan, Kansas, United States About Website The Manhattan Mercury covers news and information in the Manhattan area, including Riley, Pottawatomie, Geary, Wabaunsee, Marshall, Clay and Washington counties in northeast Kansas. Frequency 5 posts / day Website themercury.com/news
Facebook fans 5.5K ⋅ Twitter followers 6.3K ⋅ Social Engagement 37 ⋅ Domain Authority 58 ⋅ Alexa Rank 478.8K

9. Leavenworth Times – News

Leavenworth Times - NewsLeavenworth, Kansas, United States About Website Follow Leavenworth Times News for breaking news, story previews and live community updates from the Leavenworth area. Frequency 20 posts / day Website leavenworthtimes.com/news
Facebook fans 7K ⋅ Twitter followers 2.1K ⋅ Social Engagement 57 ⋅ Domain Authority 55 ⋅ Alexa Rank 322.6K

10. Dodge City Daily Globe – News

Dodge City Daily Globe - NewsDodge City, Kansas, United States About Website The Dodge City Daily Globe provides news and information on the latest top stories, weather, entertainment, politics and more. Frequency 25 posts / day Website dodgeglobe.com/news
Facebook fans 6.8K ⋅ Twitter followers 3K ⋅ Social Engagement 13 ⋅ Domain Authority 55 ⋅ Alexa Rank 2.4M

11. The Kansan – News

The Kansan - NewsNewton, Kansas, United States About Website The Kansan covers Newton and Harvey County, Kansas with the news and information on the latest top stories, weather, entertainment, politics and more. Frequency 23 posts / day Website thekansan.com/news
Facebook fans 4.8K ⋅ Twitter followers 1.6K ⋅ Domain Authority 54 ⋅ Alexa Rank 835.3K

12. Wellington Daily News

Wellington Daily NewsWellington, Kansas, United States About Website Get the latest breaking news, sports, entertainment, obituaries from Wellington Daily News. Frequency 21 posts / day Website wellingtondailynews.com/news
Facebook fans 5.9K ⋅ Twitter followers 1.2K ⋅ Domain Authority 47 ⋅ Alexa Rank 5.1M

13. McPherson Sentinel – News

McPherson Sentinel - NewsKansas, United States About Website McPherson Sentinel provides local news in McPherson County community. Frequency 21 posts / day Website mcphersonsentinel.com/news
Facebook fans 3.7K ⋅ Twitter followers 1.5K ⋅ Domain Authority 50 ⋅ Alexa Rank 3.3M

14. Osage County Online

Osage County OnlineKansas, United States About Website Osage County Online provide news and information about Osage County, Kansas, and the surrounding area. Frequency 4 posts / day Website osagecountyonline.com
Facebook fans 3.8K ⋅ Twitter followers 284 ⋅ Domain Authority 31 ⋅ Alexa Rank 4.3M

The post Top 15 Kansas News Websites To Follow in 2020 (US State) appeared first on Feedspot Blog.



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