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U.S. Woman From Cruise Falls Ill as 2,200 Head Home: Virus Update

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(Bloomberg) — The illness of an 83-year-old U.S. cruise-line traveler with the coronavirus has raised concern as more than 2,200 passengers and crew head home after being trapped at sea for almost two weeks.The first coronavirus death outside Asia, a Chinese tourist in France, and new cases in Japan, Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia suggest no let up in the outbreak.The UN’s top doctor warned the virus is unpredictable as he called for nations to get all units of government involved.Key DevelopmentsChina’s total people affected: 66,492; deaths: 1,523WHO says virus path ‘impossible to predict’Westerdam passengers blocked from leaving MalaysiaU.S. senators urge emergency funding for responseEurope Suffers First Virus Death as Fatalities Move Beyond AsiaU.S. plans to evacuate Americans on board the Diamond Princess cruise shipU.K. releases eight of nine infected patientsLocking People Up to Stop Virus Spread Could Prompt Legal FightsClick VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the novel coronavirus and here for maps and charts. For analysis of the impact from Bloomberg Economics, click here.WHO Chief Urges Broader Response (3:45 p.m. NY)World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus urged the international community on Saturday to make their response to the coronavirus government-wide.“This is not a job for health ministers alone. It takes a whole-of-government approach,” he said in a speech at the Munich Security Conference. “That approach must be coherent and coordinated, guided by evidence and public health priorities.”The WHO chief again praised China, saying the steps taken by the Beijing government are encouraging.“China has bought the world time. We don’t know how much time,” he said. “We’re encouraged that outside China, we have not yet seen widespread community transmission.”Liner Passengers Can’t Leave Malaysia (2:45 p.m. NY)Some passengers from the Westerdam luxury liner were blocked from leaving Malaysia after an 83-year-old U.S. woman from the ship tested positive for the coronavirus, the Dutch RIVM National Institute for Public Health and the Environment said by phone.The travelers who left when the ship docked in Cambodia and headed to Malaysia were denied boarding an Amsterdam-bound flight from Kuala Lumpur, according to the Dutch foreign ministry. Two were Dutch citizens, both RIVM and the foreign ministry said. They remained in Malaysia, along with a group of Dutch citizens that may have had contact with the infected woman, who also remains in the country. The RIVM estimates 11 people weren’t able to board.Holland America, which operates the liner, on Saturday said everyone on the ship was tested on Feb. 10 and none had an elevated temperature, and during the cruise “no indication” of the coronavirus was evident.The ship with more than 2,200 passengers and crew was allowed by Cambodia to dock in the port city of Sihanoukville on Friday after being turned away by countries including Japan and Thailand over fears it harbored the coronavirus. The company said 236 customers and 747 crew remained on the ship on Saturday after many took charter flights to Phnom Penh to start trips home.A number of Dutch citizens are home and will be monitored daily by local authorities. The Holland America line ship had 91 Dutch passengers, a spokesman for the RIVM said.Democrats Urge Extra U.S. Virus Funds (12:30 p.m. NY)The Trump administration was “strongly urged” by Senate Democrats to seek emergency funding to fight the coronavirus, and in a letter released Saturday they criticized officials for not being forthcoming about the costs of U.S. action.A decision this month by Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar to shift $136 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other units showed a “need for more resources,” senators led by Patty Murray of Washington state wrote to the White House, even as administration officials “continue to assert that there are already sufficient resources.”Emergency funding would cover states’ costs to implement federal orders such as travel screening and quarantines, the lawmakers said.Ship Passengers to Be Isolated in U.S. (11:30 a.m. NY)The approximately 400 U.S. citizens aboard the quarantined Diamond Princess in Japan, who are to be evacuated by the State Department, will be housed separately from other Americans who earlier returned from China and are under 14-day isolation orders.The ship’s passengers will be screened for the coronavirus before they leave the ship in Yokohama, before takeoff, during the flight and when they land at Travis Air Force Base in California, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Saturday. Screening will continue for passengers transferred to Lackland base in Texas.Canada Sends 3 to Diamond Princess (11 a.m. NY)Canada’s Public Health Agency is sending three officials to assess the situation on Carnival Corp.’s Diamond Princess, quarantined in Yokohama, as more passengers are diagnosed with the coronavirus. The ship is the largest infection cluster outside China.Global Affairs Canada is working with Japan to determine next steps, spokesperson Barbara Harvey said in an email on Saturday.Some 3,500 people are on the ship. An additional 67 cases have been found, the Japanese health minister said, pushing total infections to almost 300.Westerdam Passenger Has Virus (9:55 a.m. NY)An 83-year-old U.S. citizen has been diagnosed with the coronavirus after traveling on the Westerdam, a Holland America Line ship that finally docked in Cambodia after being spurned by multiple countries.The woman and her husband were among 145 passengers who flew to Malaysia on Friday, the country’s health ministry said in a statement. She was found with symptoms and sent to a hospital where she’s in isolation in stable condition. Her 85-year-old husband tested negative but placed under observation.The Westerdam, a luxury liner, arrived in Sihanoukville early Thursday with more than 2,200 passengers and crew.Virus Path ‘Impossible to Predict’ (9:45 a.m. NY)All nations must be ready to handle coronavirus cases and prepared to prevent further transmission, according to the head of the World Health Organization.“It’s impossible to predict what direction this epidemic will take,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement at the Munich Security Conference.“We’re concerned by the continued increase of the number of cases in China,” he added, saying there has been a “lack of urgency” from the international community in funding a response.“Most of all, we’re concerned about the potential havoc this virus could wreak in countries with weaker health systems,” Tedros said. “We must use the window of opportunity we have to intensify our preparedness.”U.K. Releases All But One Patient (8:30 a.m. NY)The U.K. discharged all but one of the nine patients being treated for the coronavirus after twice testing negative, the government said Saturday. A center in Milton Keynes, north of London, still has 100 people, the NHS said.All 94 people being kept in in quarantine in Wirral after returning from China also have been released, according to the statement.5 New Singapore Cases (8 a.m. NY)Singapore confirmed five new cases of the coronavirus, all linked to previous cases, the Ministry of Health said Saturday, increasing the total people infected to 72.Epidemic Poses ‘Severe Challenges’ to China (6:44 a.m. NY)“The epidemic has posed a severe challenge to China’s economic and social development,” Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said at the Munich Security Conference. “Nonetheless, the difficulties will be temporary and short-lived. With its strong resilience and vitality, the Chinese economy is well-positioned to overcome all risks and challenges. The fundamentals sustaining sound economic growth have not changed and will not change.”Death in France First From Disease in Europe (6:15 p.m. HK)An 80-year-old Chinese tourist died in Paris, becoming the first fatality of the coronavirus in Europe, France’s health ministry said. The man’s daughter, 50, was also infected and remains in a hospital in Paris. There are now 10 remaining cases in France and four of those have been released from hospital after recovering from the virus, Health Minister Agnes Buzyn said on Saturday.China is Testing Vaccines on Animals (5 p.m. HK)China is testing some vaccines against the coronavirus on animals, Zhang Xinmin, an official with the science and technology ministry, said at a press conference on Saturday. Vaccine research has been given top priority by the central government and the ministry has coordinated with several departments to find a solution.Earlier, China said it’s administering its centuries-old traditional medicine along with Western medicines on patients affected by the coronavirus disease. Traditional Chinese Medicine, or TCM as the method is called, was applied on more than half of confirmed cases in Hubei. To read the full story, click here.Why Reports of Drugs for Coronavirus Are Premature: QuickTakeU.S. to Evacuate Citizens from Diamond Princess (4 p.m. HK)The State Department will evacuate its citizens and their families from the virus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship that’s been quarantined in Japan, the American embassy in Japan said. The ship is the largest infection cluster outside China, with an additional 67 cases reported on Saturday.Chartered aircraft will bring American passengers and crew back to the U.S., where they will be quarantined for two weeks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the liner has appropximately 400 U.S. citizens.To read the full story, click here.Isolation in Beijing (3:30 p.m. HK)The city of more than 21 million residents told people to quarantine themselves at home for two weeks in the latest attempt to keep the deadly coronavirus from spreading. New arrivals should stay at home for observation for 14 days because it’s sometimes unclear to authorities which provinces they may have visited or transited in, He Qinghua, an official with the ministry of public health, told reporters. He did not specify who exactly the quarantine would apply to.To read full story, click here.Lunar New Year Travel Market Plunged (3:15 p.m. HK)Air, rail and road travel market got slammed during the peak Lunar New Year season as fears about the spreading coronavirus prompted people to abandon trips.Passenger travel would likely fall 45% on-year during the 40-day travel season that ends Feb. 18, the transport ministry said. Between Jan 25. and Feb. 14, airlines carried an average of 470,000 people a day, only a quarter of last year’s volume. Passengers from Feb. 15-23 were only a tenth of the peak period.Read full story here.Cash is Quarantined Too (1:45 p.m. HK)China cut off the transfer and allocation of old bank notes across provinces, and between cities most affected by the deadly outbreak, according to Fan Yifei, deputy governor of the People’s Bank of China. The central bank also ramped up measures to sanitize old money to reduce contagion risks and added 600 billion yuan ($85.9 billion) of new cash for Hubei, the epicenter of the coronavirus, he said.WHO is Arriving in Beijing (1:30 p.m. HK)The World Health Organization and other international experts will arrive in Beijing this weekend. They will visit three provinces and cities to learn about virus protection and control measures and will make suggestions, the National Health Commission said on its website.PBOC Says Virus Won’t Cause Large Price Increases (11:44 a.m. HK)The virus outbreak is putting pressure on price stability because production has been delayed, but it won’t lead to large-scale inflationary pressures, China’s central bank said.The People’s Bank of China’s stance is unchanged and it will maintain prudent monetary policy, Deputy Governor Fan Yifei said in Beijing Saturday. The central bank is confident the effects of the outbreak can be dealt with, and the economy can be kept stable, according to a statement released before the briefing.New Zealand Extends Travel Restrictions (9:45 a.m. HK)New Zealand said temporary restrictions on travel from China have been extended for a further eight days, calling it “a precautionary approach” and a matter of public health. The country is preventing foreign nationals traveling from, or transiting through, mainland China from entering, and the position will be reviewed every 48 hours.Most Critical Time, says Health Commission Official (9:15 a.m. HK)China is entering the most critical time in its fight to contain the spreading coronavirus, Wang Hesheng, deputy director of the National Health Commission, said during a televised briefing from Wuhan. While Wang didn’t elaborate on the comment, outside of Hubei, the number of new confirmed cases have declined for the past 10 days, according to Liang Wannian, an expert at the NHC. Several other provinces have sent 217 medical teams to Wuhan as of Feb. 14, Wang said.Apple to Reopen Shanghai Store (9 a.m. HK)Apple Inc. would open one of the seven stores it has in Shanghai starting today, according to a company statement. The maker of iPhones had earlier said it will reopen stores in Beijing, according to an earlier announcement.Trump Says Xi ‘Working Very Hard’ (5 a.m. HK)President Donald Trump said Chinese leader Xi Jinping is “working very hard” on controlling the outbreak.“It’s a tremendous problem. But they’re very capable and they’ll get to it,” Trump said at a Washington event Friday with Border Patrol agents, noting he has spoken with Xi.Of Americans with the virus, “many of them are getting better. Some are fully recovered already. So we’re in very good shape,” he said.Wuhan Sharply Tightens Lockdown of Residents (1 p.m. NY)Wuhan tightened its quarantine on residents and said people will be confined to their neighborhoods except to seek medical care, work to fight the outbreak or keep vital services going. Wuhan has opened quarantine centers to house thousands of patients and others with symptoms, and Hubei province, where the city is located, has announced thousands of new cases a day, according to a statement.Wuhan residents will now be allowed to leave residential compounds only for medical care. Other cities that have put lockdowns in place have allowed people to leave every few days to buy food. Neighborhoods will be barricaded off to keep people from getting in or out, and non-residents won’t be able to enter neighborhoods that aren’t theirs.Researchers Publish New Images of the Virus (9:54 a.m. NY)U.S. researchers published new images of the coronavirus, some of the most detailed visuals yet of the pathogen.The images were released Thursday by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. They were made with scanning and transmission electron microscopes.To see more of the images, click here.\–With assistance from Pavel Alpeyev, Chelsea Mes, Yinan Zhao, Niu Shuping, Iain Rogers, Michael Bellusci and Wout Vergauwen.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Jing Yang in Shanghai at jyang251@bloomberg.net;Dong Lyu in Beijing at dlyu3@bloomberg.net;Steve Geimann in Washington at sgeimann@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, Anand KrishnamoorthyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Reeling World Economy Slammed by Dangerous Disinflationary Shock

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(Bloomberg) — The sinking global economy is suffering through a colossal disinflationary shock that could briefly push it into dangerous deflation territory for the first time in decades.With many national economies all but shutting down in an effort to contain the coronavirus, prices on everything from oil and copper to hotel rooms and restaurant take-out are tumbling.“A powerful disinflationary tide is now rising,” said Joseph Lupton, global economist at JPMorgan Chase & Co.That’s worrying because it could lengthen what may be the deepest recession since the Great Depression. Ebbing pricing power makes it harder for companies that piled on debt in the good times to meet their obligations. This could prompt them to make additional cuts in payrolls and investment or even default on their debts and go bankrupt.While weak or falling prices may seem like an unalloyed good for consumers, a widespread deflationary price decline can be deleterious for the whole economy. Households hold off buying in anticipation of ever lower prices, and companies postpone investments because they see limited profit opportunities.Even after the coronavirus crisis eases, the scars from the shutdown — elevated unemployment, shattered consumer and company confidence, and staggered returns to work — may keep price pressures in check, prompting central banks to hold interest rates at rock-bottom levels for a protracted period.“They’re at zero for at least the next two years,” Ethan Harris, head of global economic research for Bank of America Corp., said of the Federal Reserve.Monetary LargessFurther down the road, though, there’s a chance that all the monetary largess — coupled with a massive outpouring of government debt to pay for measures to fight the virus — could spawn a build-up in price pressures.“It’s possible that the response to this over the longer term could have an inflationary consequence,” former New York Federal Reserve Bank of New York President Bill Dudley told an April 2 webinar organized by Princeton University. “But in the near term, it’s very definitely on the disinflationary/deflationary side.”Lupton and his fellow JPMorgan economists forecast that their global consumer-price index will temporarily fall below its year-ago level sometime around the middle of 2020, the first time that’s happened in many decades.Much of that is due to plunging oil prices. Even with their rebound last week on reports of potential production cutbacks, they’re still down about 55% since Jan. 1.But other prices are also slipping, including for services. They have long been resistant to the downward tug that prices for internationally traded goods have been subject to, but now service-sector businesses are being slammed by the shutdowns. Lupton sees worldwide core inflation — excluding food and energy costs — falling below 1% and says there’s a risk it could stay there.Disinflationary Force“The overwhelming disinflationary force is quite large,” Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton in Chicago, told Bloomberg Radio on April 3.While industrial countries — with the exception of Japan — avoided falling into deflation in the wake of the 2008-09 financial crisis, they’re entering this one with inflation already at depressed levels.Perhaps the world’s biggest source of deflation right now is China, where producer prices registered a 0.4% decline in February compared with a year ago after rising 0.1% in January. That’s a drag on the price of goods being shipped overseas from the world’s biggest trading nation.But China isn’t the only country in pain.Chain restaurants across Japan have rolled out discount plans for takeout menus, including Yoshinoya Co., which serves bowls of beef on rice and is running a 15%-off campaign.Read more: Deflation a Real Risk for Japan, Former BOJ Economy Chief SaysThe British Retail Consortium reported on April 1 that shop prices fell 0.8% in March, the biggest decline since May 2018, following a 0.6% February drop.And in the U.S., domestic air fares plunged by an average of 14% between March 4 and March 7, according to booking site Hopper.com. Average revenue per hotel room plummeted 80% during the March 22-28 week from year-ago levels, hospitality-data firm STR reported.“In terms of our business, COVID-19 is like nothing we’ve ever seen before,” Marriott International Inc. Chief Executive Officer Arne Sorenson said in March 19 video. “For a company that’s 92 years old, that’s borne witness to the Great Depression, World War II and many other economic and global crises, that’s saying something.”Investors seem to be looking for a long period of very low inflation, according to trading in inflation-protected securities, although some analysts caution the readings may be distorted by a dash for cash.Even before the crisis, monetary-policy makers were worried inflation was too low for the good of their economies. Now they have even more reason for concern.“Deflation cannot be ruled out, but I refuse to make an estimate,” European Central Bank Governing Council member Robert Holzman said. “If deflation is due to a slump in the real economy, it will be difficult to solve this through monetary-policy instruments alone.”Some economists think it’s inflation, not deflation, that’s the problem.“What will then happen as the lock down gets lifted and recovery ensues, following a period of massive fiscal and monetary expansion?” London School of Economics Emeritus Professor Charles Goodhart and Talking Heads Macroeconomics founder Manoj Pradhan wrote for VOX on March 27. “The answer, as in the aftermath of wars, will be a surge in inflation, quite likely more than 5% and even in the order of 10% in 2021.Former chief White House economist Jason Furman said faster inflation should be welcomed, not worried about.“I don’t think we should be afraid of getting inflation,” Furman, who is now a professor at Harvard University, told Bloomberg Radio on April 2. “If we get inflation that would be good. That would be a good sign that we have adequate demand.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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The first American small-batch whiskey made specifically for French consumers

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When Ashley Donahey began thinking about a future producing her own bourbon whiskey, she was still gainfully employed at the State Department as an adviser to the U.S. ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues. Two Worlds Whiskey, the brand she launched this month, was still years away, but in some respects its creation was an inevitability. The former diplomat’s passion for bourbon stemmed from her Kentucky upbringing in a family whose heritage is at once intimately tied to the American Revolution and to the early days of whiskey distilling.

In 1777, the Marquis de Lafayette set sail for America to assist the American rebels in their fight for liberty. Donahey’s fifth great grandfather, William Downard, was among the rebels in Pennsylvania who went on to become victorious, thanks in part to France and the commitment of Lafayette. After moving to Kentucky after the war, Downard began distilling whiskey just as two French brothers, Jean and Louis Tarascon, had begun making a novel style of whiskey, one aged in charred oak barrels following the centuries-old tradition of aging cognac. A swift sensation among the French cognac aficionados living farther down the Ohio River in New Orleans, the new style earned the name bourbon whiskey as a nod to the French House of Bourbon—or so the legend holds.

Ashley Donahey, founder of Two Worlds Whiskey
Jesse Morgan

While it might be considered the ultimate homegrown American spirit,
bourbon’s origins are inextricably connected to France. Similarly, so were
Donahey’s family ties. During World War II, her grandfather fought along the
Normandy coast all the way to Cherbourg, where he remained until liberation. As
traumatic as wartime was, he looked back on his time living in France with
great fondness.

Growing up with such family memories was significant in leading Donahey down an academic and professional path—first studying French linguistics, then working in global diplomacy and business—that would permanently anchor her to France.

As for her hometown spirit, that affection stayed with Donahey throughout her career in Washington and became the foundation of a germinating idea. With even greater urgency following the radical shift in the U.S. administration in 2017, the idea became the catalyst for a total career change.

Two Worlds Whiskey is touted as the first “luxury” American whiskey crafted exclusively for France.
Jesse Morgan

That’s when she left behind a steady six-figure salary, moved to France (the No. 1 consumer of whiskey per capita), and enrolled in INSEEC business school to acquire the skills to launch a brand of her own. By 2018, Donahey was working as a brand ambassador for La Maison du Whiskey in Paris, traveling across France running tastings for bartenders, shop owners, and whiskey lovers. That’s when the startling realization hit: The French are well versed in whiskeys from Japan, Scotland, and Ireland, but they are virtually unaware of their country’s historic contributions to the creation and popularization of American whiskey.

“If they had any experience with bourbon, it was with entry-level mass market brands,” Donahey explains. “But they certainly didn’t know about the French ties nor did they have access to the best bottles.”

Donahey knew then that her brand would seek to reinforce the historic alliance between the U.S. and its first ally, France, and offer flavor profiles tailored to the sophisticated French palate.

Named for Lafayette, the “hero of two worlds,” Two Worlds Whiskey will produce several ranges, crafted with the help of The Spirits Group, a woman-run distilling consultancy in Louisville. La Victoire, the kickoff range launched with a preorder crowdfunding campaign, is a small-batch bourbon made from barrels of straight bourbon whiskey distilled and aged in the United States and bottled in Cognac. L’Alliance, the second range, also named for one of the three ships Lafayette sailed to reach America, will be distilled and aged in the U.S. but finished in France through secondary maturation in French wine or spirits casks.

From left: Donahey with chief barrel officer Monica Wolf and master blender Ashley Barnes.
Jesse Morgan

But it’s the third range, L’Hermione, that Donahey says makes her project completely novel. “It involves importing American whiskey distillate and doing the primary maturation in France, in French oak barrels, made by French coopers, in the South of France where the climate is similar to that of Kentucky,” she explains. “When it happens, it will be the very first French-American whiskey.”

That last range, the most ambitious arm of the project, will require
building an aging cellar in Provence and, as a result, bringing on outside
investors (thus far, the operation has been self-financed). For now, Donahey,
who is based in Paris, is working on selling the first 2,107 bottles of the
first batch—in a pandemic.

“Within 72 hours, I went from hosting a sold-out launch party at a prestigious venue in Paris, with guests flying in as far as Kentucky and Kenya, to hosting an impromptu Facebook Live in my living room,” Donahey says. “But I am grateful that I was still able to launch digitally and allow my supporters to reserve their bottles from the safety of their homes. I think everyone needs something to look forward to right now.”

More must-read stories from Fortune:

—Diary of a lockdown: What it feels like in 17 cities during the coronavirus
—How my job as a yoga studio owner has changed during the pandemic
—Will the coronavirus finally get Americans to embrace the bidet?
—Listen to Leadership Next, a Fortune podcast examining the evolving role of CEOs
Italian winemakers grapple with the coronavirus lockdown
—WATCH: Can San Francisco Be Saved?

Follow Fortune on Flipboard to stay up-to-date on the latest news and analysis.



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Food companies have 7 days to remove cargo from ports

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CARGO owners, which include major food companies, now have seven days to withdraw reefers from Manila’s congested ports before these are forfeited in favor of the government. 

Joint Administrative Order No. 20-01 dated April 2 expedites the release of refrigerated containers and dry vans that have piled up in Manila ports amid the enhanced community quarantine (ECQ). 

The order, published in a newspaper on Sunday, included a list of  companies whose cargoes remain at the Manila ports. 

Under the order, cargo not withdrawn within the given timeframe will be considered abandoned or forfeited, and disposed of by the Bureau of Customs.

The order said that a list of reefer containers pending at ports, including the name of the consignee, will be published in government websites, social media, and leading newspapers to inform the public of the immediate need to withdraw the reefers.

“The public shall be informed that non-withdrawal within seven (7) days shall result to abandonment.”

Fastfood companies Jollibee Foods Corp. and Golden Arches Development Corp. (McDonalds Philippines) are included in the list.

Food and beverage companies San Miguel Foods, Inc.; Procter & Gamble Philippines, Inc.; The Purefoods Hormel Co., Inc.; Century Pacific Food, Inc.; Monde Nissin Corp.; Prime Pacific Foods Corp.; and Universal Robina Corp. also have cargo pending at Manila ports.

The Philippine Ports Authority (PPA) can impose penalties for refrigerated and chilled cargo that are not removed from the ports.

Within 24 hours after a decree of abandonment and forfeiture has been issued on these containers, the Bureau of Customs (BoC) will decide how these items will be disposed off. Goods that are fit for consumption will be donated to the Office of Civil Defense, once approved by the Finance secretary.

The PPA had earlier warned that cargo congestion at Manila ports may cause the terminals to shut down, and may lead to a shortage in food and other supplies.

The order was released in order to “ensure the availability of essential goods, in particular food and medicine, by adopting measures as may reasonably be necessary to facilitate and/or minimize disruption to the supply chain.”

The list also includes dozens of containers for fishery companies, including the Royale Fishing Corp., Silver Sea Star Fishing, and Maria Fe Fishing Corp.

Rustan Coffee Corp. (Starbucks Coffee Philippines), Foodsphere, Inc.; Fonterra Brands Philippines, Inc.; Happy Hunting Ground Farms Corp., and Consolidated Dairy and Frozen Food are also in the list, among many others.

Non-food companies like Glaxosmithkline Philippines, Inc.; Universal Power Solutions, Inc.; Rizal Commercial Banking Corp. also have cargo pending at the ports.

The order was signed by the Department of Trade and Industry, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Finance, the Bureau of Customs, and the Philippine Ports Authority. — Jenina P. Ibanez



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