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Top 15 Democracy And Governance Podcasts You Must Follow in 2020

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Top 10 Democracy And Governance Podcasts
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Democracy And Governance Podcasts

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1. The Argument

New York City, New York, United States About Podcast The other side is dangerously wrong. They think you are too. But for democracy to work, we need to hear each other out. Each week New York Times Opinion columnists David Leonhardt, Michelle Goldberg and Ross Douthat explain the arguments from across the political spectrum. Their candid debates help you form your own opinion of the latest news, and learn how the other half thinks. Find the best ways to persuade in the modern search for common ground. Frequency 1 episode / week Since Oct 2018 Podcast nytimes.com/column/the-argument
Facebook fans 17M ⋅ Twitter followers 45.1M ⋅ Domain Authority 95 ⋅ Alexa Rank 97

2. Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!New York, United States About Podcast Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. They provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Their programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make a change in extraordinary times. Frequency 1 episode / day Since Apr 2017 Podcast open.spotify.com/show/3cN..
Facebook fans 1.3M ⋅ Twitter followers 714.3K ⋅ Instagram Followers 219.9K ⋅ Domain Authority 93 ⋅ Alexa Rank 70

3. Keeping Democracy Alive with Burt Cohen

Keeping Democracy Alive with Burt CohenPortsmouth, New Hampshire, United States About Podcast Democracy is not a spectator sport, it requires informed participating citizens. On Keeping Democracy Alive, they delve into dynamics that both inhibit democracy and reinvigorate it. Looking into issues from domestic economic issues to foreign, labor, trade, and education policy to wealth gap, and internet issues. Frequency 1 episode / day Since Apr 2010 Podcast keepingdemocracyalive.com/po..
Facebook fans 862 ⋅ Twitter followers 74 ⋅ Social Engagement 78 ⋅ Domain Authority 27 ⋅ Alexa Rank 6M

4. This is Democracy

This is DemocracyAustin, Texas, United States About Podcast The future of democracy is uncertain, but we are committed to its urgent renewal today. This podcast will draw on historical knowledge to inspire a contemporary democratic renaissance. Their goal is to advance democratic change, one show at a time. Dr. Jeremi Suri, a renowned scholar of democracy, will host the podcast and moderate discussions. Frequency 4 episodes / month Since Jul 2018 Podcast podcasts.la.utexas.edu/this-..
Twitter followers 4.3K ⋅ Domain Authority 93 ⋅ Alexa Rank 3.6K

5. Keen On Democracy

Keen On DemocracyCalifornia, United States About Podcast Join Andrew Keen as he travels around the globe investigating the contemporary crisis of democracy. Hear from the world’s most informed citizens about the rise of populism, authoritarian and illiberal democracy. Listen to Keen’s commentary on and solutions to this crisis of democracy. Frequency 2 episodes / month Since Jan 2019 Podcast ajkeen.libsyn.com
Twitter followers 23.4K ⋅ Domain Authority 9 ⋅ Alexa Rank 3.9K

6. Democracy Works

Democracy WorksState College, Pennsylvania, United States About Podcast Examining what it means to live in a democracy, ‘Democracy Works’ seeks to answer that question by examining a different aspect of democratic life each week from voting to criminal justice to the free press and everything in between. They interview experts who study democracy, as well as people who are out there doing the hard work of democracy day in and day out. Hosts Michael Berkman and Chris Beem, Jenna Spinelle aim to rise above partisan bickering and hot takes on the news to have informed, nonpartisan, thought-provoking discussions about issues related to democracy. Frequency 1 episode / week Since Mar 2018 Podcast democracyworkspodcast.com/ep..
Facebook fans 633 ⋅ Twitter followers 773 ⋅ Domain Authority 32

7. Moving Forward

Moving ForwardMaryland, United States About Podcast Active, engaged citizens, fighting for progressive values, help make our democracy stronger. In the Moving Forward podcast, you’ll hear about the contributions these engaged citizens make to address the challenges that face us. Host Kate Sanner interviews candidates, community leaders, community activists, and elected officials on a number of civic, political and social justice topics. Frequency 1 episode / month Since Sep 2018 Podcast moving-forward.libsyn.com/we..
Twitter followers 4.7K ⋅ Domain Authority 3 ⋅ Alexa Rank 4K

8. Democracy Forum

Democracy ForumMaine, United States About Podcast Democracy Forum, with host Ann Luther, featuring topics in Maine’s participatory democracy, encouraging citizens to take an active role in government and politics. Frequency 1 episode / month Since Oct 2012 Podcast podchaser.com/podcasts/democ..
Facebook fans 7.1K ⋅ Twitter followers 1.8K ⋅ Instagram Followers 863 ⋅ Domain Authority 47 ⋅ Alexa Rank 99.2K

9. James Madison Center for Civic Engagement: Democracy Matters

James Madison Center for Civic Engagement: Democracy MattersHarrisonburg, Virginia, United States About Podcast The James Madison Center for Civic Engagement launches new podcast, Democracy Matters, featuring interviews with academics, practitioners, students and community members exploring themes related to civic learning and democratic engagement in order to build a more just and inclusive democracy. Frequency 1 episode / month Since Jun 2019 Podcast open.spotify.com/show/1ix..
Facebook fans 154 ⋅ Twitter followers 521 ⋅ Instagram Followers 435 ⋅ Domain Authority 93 ⋅ Alexa Rank 70

10. How to Fix Democracy

How to Fix DemocracyWashington, District Of Columbia, United States About Podcast Since its origins, democracy has been a work in progress. Today, many question its resilience. How to Fix Democracy, a collaboration of the Bertelsmann Foundation and Humanity in Action explores practical solutions for how to address the increasing threats democracy faces. Host Andrew Keen interviews prominent international thinkers and practitioners of democracy. Their conversations are designed to provoke discussion and curiosity about the state and future of democracy across the globe. Frequency 3 episodes / quarter Since Jan 2019 Podcast howtofixdemocracy.libsyn.com
Facebook fans 808 ⋅ Twitter followers 3K ⋅ Domain Authority 13 ⋅ Alexa Rank 3.9K

11. Advocates for direct democracy

Advocates for direct democracyCanada About Podcast Welcome to ‘Advocates for direct democracy’, giving sovereignty back to the people promoting Direct democracy, a political system that lets people vote on important issues through referendums. Frequency 3 episodes / quarter Since Mar 2018 Podcast anchor.fm/AFDD
Facebook fans 13K ⋅ Twitter followers 131 ⋅ Domain Authority 74 ⋅ Alexa Rank 5.6K

12. Democracy That Delivers

Democracy That DeliversWashington, District Of Columbia, United States About Podcast The Democracy That Delivers podcast is about democratic and economic development and the intersection between the two. Through their personal stories, guests share how their work is helping build stronger democratic institutions in countries all over the world and how they are tackling some of the major governance challenges that many countries face today. The weekly discussion covers a wide range of topics including entrepreneurship, governance, rule of law, and the role of the private sector in democratic processes. Frequency 1 episode / week Since Feb 2016 Podcast cipe.org/podcast
Facebook fans 11.1K ⋅ Twitter followers 7.2K ⋅ Domain Authority 56 ⋅ Alexa Rank 555.2K

13. Race and Democracy

Race and DemocracyAustin, Texas, United States About Podcast Dr. Peniel Joseph, Founding Director of the UT Center for the Study of Race and Democracy and Professor of History, discusses issues of race, democracy, public policy, and social justice with expert guests. ‘Race and Democracy’ questions who is America? Where have we been, where do we want to go, and how can we get there? Tune in to learn about American history, race and democracy, and the outlook for the future. Frequency 1 episode / month Since Oct 2018 Podcast podcasts.la.utexas.edu/racea..
Facebook fans 348 ⋅ Twitter followers 229 ⋅ Instagram Followers 123.9K ⋅ Domain Authority 93 ⋅ Alexa Rank 3.7K

14. Speak Out with Tim Wise

Speak Out with Tim WiseOakland, California, United States About Podcast Speak Out with Tim Wise is an informative and entertaining podcast aimed at promoting multiracial democracy and justice in dangerous times. The show features the biting, factual, and humorous commentary of its host, alongside dialogue with some of the nation’s leading scholars, artists, and activists, as well as grassroots community leaders whose voices are often ignored in the dominant media. Frequency 1 episode / quarter Since Sep 2017 Podcast podomatic.com/podcasts/speak..
Facebook fans 5.3K ⋅ Twitter followers 948 ⋅ Instagram Followers 8K ⋅ Domain Authority 83 ⋅ Alexa Rank 28K

The post Top 15 Democracy And Governance Podcasts You Must Follow in 2020 appeared first on Feedspot Blog.



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Marketing Strategies

Are Your Calls to Action Working Hard Enough?

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What makes a good call to action (CTA), where they should be used and how to track their effectiveness in Google Analytics.

If you want to turn website visitors into paying customers, you need calls to action that compel them to take that final step. You invest a lot of time, money and other resources into bringing traffic to your website, so it makes sense to convert as many of those visitors as possible into leads and customers.

Sadly, if your CTAs aren’t working hard enough, you’re letting potential customers slip through your hands. In this article, we look at the key aspects of effective CTAs and how you can make them work harder for your brand.

What is a call to action?

A call to action is an instructional message aimed at persuading people to take immediate action. This sales and marketing device has been used for decades to literally call upon audiences to take profitable actions; buy something, call for more info, sign up to an email list etc.

Before the age of the internet, we had CTAs at the end of radio ads, in print magazine ads and at the bottom of posters.

Source

Now, when we talk about calls to action, we’re generally referring to sections of a web page or email that look a little more like this:

Example of CTA on Vertical Leap websiteOne of the CTAs on the Vertical Leap website.

Here, we have the classic anatomy of a website’s call to action:

  1. Heading
  2. CTA copy
  3. CTA button

You’ll see this pattern repeated across the web where brands use these three elements to create a concise, compelling message, urging users to take action. They then provide the means of completing this action by clicking on the CTA button.

Example of CTA

So the calls to action on your website need to do two things. First, your CTA copy has to create enough incentive that visitors are compelled to take action. Then your CTA buttons pave the way for them to satisfy this urge with a single click.

Why should I use a call to action?

People who visit your website and don’t take action aren’t much good to you. Your marketing strategy depends on people buying, downloading, clicking and completing actions that contribute, in some way, to sales and profit. But people generally don’t take these kinds of action without motivation or an indication that the reward is worth the effort.

Your ad campaigns, content strategy and other marketing efforts build up the necessary motivation to engage with your brand and it’s up to your CTAs to turn this motivation into action.

Purchases are the most obvious use case for CTAs. But the most important calls to action are often the ones that keep leads engaged with your brand before they’ve decided to make the purchase – e.g. email signups, content downloads, free trials, webinar signups etc.

Without CTAs targeting these secondary conversion goals, you’re letting the vast majority of leads – those who aren’t ready to buy yet – slip away.

Where should they be used?

Every page on your website should have at least one CTA calling upon users to complete one of your conversion goals. Even pages that aren’t primarily designed to sell – for example, your blog posts – should have a CTA for a secondary conversion goal, like signing up to your newsletter or getting in touch with your business.

The Vertical Leap CTA we looked at earlier appears at the bottom of every page on the Vertical Leap website.

On every blog post, we also have the following CTA appear directly after the article itself:

Sign up for newsletter CTA

Now, these CTAs demand very little from users so it makes sense to have these at the bottom of blog posts where purchase intent is generally low. But what about the CTAs for your primary conversion goals, like purchases, bookings, quotes etc?

Your homepage

Of all places, your homepage should summarise what your brand is about and, ideally, you want to achieve this above the fold. This isn’t always easy but your aim is to communicate what makes your business unique and why people should be excited about buying from you.

Mailchimp homepage

If you’re selling a single product/service or have a clear brand position (like Mailchimp, above), there’s no reason you shouldn’t be able to do this. However, businesses selling much larger product ranges and competing in saturated markets will always find it more difficult to justify primary CTAs on their homepage.

Next homepage

Landing pages

Landing pages are the place for your primary CTAs. This is where you should see the best performance because your ad campaigns have targeted consumer interest and brought them here to do business.

The key things with landing page CTAs is to match the search intent of users as closely as possible. The simplest way to do this is to do your keyword research, create individual campaigns for all the queries that matter and then create unique landing pages for each one of them with CTAs that hammer home the message.

Relevance is everything here.

search result for software for remote teams

In the search query above, the user clearly states that they’re looking for software to help remote teams work together, not just generic team management software. Monday’s software essentially works the same for in-house and remote teams but the company understands its target audiences.

Not only does it bag the top position for this query but it puts the key phrase “remote team” at the centre of its campaign.

Monday landing page

More importantly, though, the company matches that same key selling point on its landing page and makes it clear to visitors that this software caters to their needs.

What does a successful CTA look like?

In terms of visual design, we’ve already looked at the typical formula for a successful call to action – the heading, copy and button trio.

HubSpot CTA example

What we’ve got here is a heading that communicates the key selling point in a few brief words, using large text and a bold font-weight to grab attention. Next, we have a section text in smaller font size and weighting that expands upon the heading and provides more detail about the key selling point. And, finally, we have a large, bold CTA button literally telling users what they’re going to get by clicking through to the next page.

The most important design principle here is contrast:

  • Colour contrast: Black text on light backgrounds, white text on a coloured CTA button.
  • Size contrast: The use of different font sizes to separate text and emphasise importance.
  • Form contrast: Bold vs regular font weights.
  • Shape contrast: The CTA button being the only defined geometric shape in view.

These forms of contrast make an effective CTA jump out from the page and give users visual feedback about which individual elements of the CTA are most important. This makes the individual elements easier to distinguish and gives their individual messages more impact.

HubSpot homepage

When it comes to CTA button colour, you should have a highlight colour that repeats for the most important elements on your site and those you want to highlight for any reason. HubSpot uses its branded orange as its highlight colour for all of its call-to-action buttons and to highlight other important elements, as you can see above.

To emphasise the CTAs on its homepage even further, the company uses a lot of greens in its hero image, which is almost opposite to orange on the colour spectrum, thus increasing contrast even further.

How effective are your CTAs?

The effectiveness of a CTA is normally measured by its conversion rate. In Google Analytics, the most accurate way to measure the performance of individual CTAs is to use Event Measurement to track the actual click of buttons.

One benefit of this is that you don’t need to create unique page redirects for each conversion goal and track them based on URLs. Another is that you can compare the total number of button clicks vs completed conversions to identify problems users might be having after they click through.

An effective call to action successfully convinces people to take action, but your CTAs can’t do this alone.

We’ve looked at some of the design principles of a successful CTA, but it’s ultimately the copy/content that convinces people to buy into your message (or not). So the wording of your CTAs is actually the most important factor – the key selling point in your heading, the additional text you provide and the wording in your CTA button.

So, if you’re looking to optimise your calls to action, start by testing different variations of CTA copy before you get bogged down in button colours and details that may have less impact on a user’s decision.

Also, keep in mind that the messages you deliver before a user sees your CTA are equally as important, if not more. So make sure your ads, landing pages, hero sections, emails and everything else are increasing incentive so that when users do see your call to action, they’re already tempted to take action.



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Marketing Strategies

Acknowledgments 2020

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Authors get to put a page in their book thanking people who have quietly and persistently and generously helped.

But the page is rarely read, and it comes out infrequently and it’s not so timely.

It’s worth taking a second to think about people who are doing more than expected, more than they have to do, more than we can imagine.

I’m filled with gratitude for the healthcare workers who have shown up to do the jobs that they never hoped to have to do, risking so much to help people. From docs like Jodi who are beginning their career in the middle of this, to retired nurses who are putting on their scrubs to help out again.

And thank you to the frontline workers and volunteers in my town and yours, from the food market to the fire department, from the gas station to the police. They’re showing up and doing it with grace.

Thanks to Zoom for dealing with a 20x increase in traffic and not missing a beat. Just like so many other tech companies that are quietly doing what they said they would do.

Thank you to the non-profit leaders, entrepreneurs and project managers who have figured out how to pivot on a dime, protecting the jobs of their teams and serving their customers in new and powerful ways.

Thanks to every parent who is at home with kids, balancing competing priorities and still being there for the ones who need them. And thanks to resilient and patient therapists, teachers and spiritual leaders who are figuring out how to be there, fully present, even if it’s on a video screen.

I’m grateful for the unseen but not anonymous people who are delivering packages, maintaining webservers, fixing the things that break and showing up every single day.

And I’m glad that so many people are ignoring the charlatans who are trying to profit from panic and untested remedies, preying on the fear that comes with a pandemic. And proud of anyone who stops clicking on a media channel that’s in the business of profiting from the attention that comes with amplifying that same fear.

I’m inspired by the team at Akimbo, working remotely from dozens of locations, shipping important work and connecting our extraordinary community of tens of thousands of people.

Thanks to my colleagues at Random Penguin and the rest of the book industry, for focusing on sharing insight and wisdom, simply because they know it’s important, not because it’s lucrative. And to my friends from all over, who are sheltering in place but sharing good vibes in so many ways.

And I’m grateful to you, loyal reader, for taking the long view, for leading, for spreading ideas that matter and showing up and doing work that you’re proud of. We wouldn’t have it any other way.

If you’re leading despite/because of what’s going on around us, thank you.

[This is such a tiny fraction of the people I was hoping to be able to acknowledge. If you’ve got a list to share, I hope you’ll post it somewhere.]

(and here’s a list from three years ago)



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Marketing in Times of Uncertainty – Whiteboard Friday

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Posted by randfish

Our work as marketers has transformed drastically in the space of a month. Today, we’re grateful to welcome our good friend Rand to talk about a topic that’s been on the forefront of our minds lately: how to do our jobs empathetically and effectively through one of the most difficult trials in modern memory.

We hope you’ve got a cozy seat in your home office, a hot mug of coffee from your own kitchen Keurig, and your cat in your lap as you join us for this week’s episode of Whiteboard Friday.

Video Transcription

Howdy, folks. I’m Rand Fishkin, founder of Moz and co-founder of Sparktoro. And I’m here today with a very special edition of Whiteboard Friday. 

I think that now is the right time to talk about marketing in uncertain epochs like the one we’re living through. We obviously have a global crisis. It’s very serious. But most of you watch Whiteboard Friday. Know that here at Moz, right, they’re trying to help. They want to help people through this crisis. And that means doing marketing. And I don’t think that now is the right time for us to stop our marketing activities. In fact, I think it’s time to probably crunch down and do some hard work. 

So let’s talk about what’s going on. And then I’ll give some tactics that I hope will be helpful to you and your teams, your clients, your bosses, everyone at your organizations as we’re going through this together. 

The business world is experiencing widespread repercussions

First off, we are in this cycle of trying to prevent massive amounts of death, which is absolutely the right thing to do. But because of that, I think a lot of us in the business world, in the marketing world, are experiencing pain, particularly in certain industries. In some industries obviously demand is spiking, it’s skyrocketing for, you know, coronavirus-related reasons. And in other cases, demand is down. That’s because we sort of have this inability to go out.

We can’t go to bars and restaurants and movies and bowling alleys and go do all the things we would normally do. So we don’t need fancy clothes to go do it and we don’t need haircuts — this is probably the last Whiteboard Friday I would want to record before needing a cut. And all of that spending, right, that consumer spending affects business-to-business spending as well

Lower spending → cost-cutting → lower investment/layoffs → environment of fear…

It leads to cost cutting by businesses because they know there’s not as much demand. It leads to lower investment and oftentimes layoffs as we saw in the United States, where nearly 10 million workers are are out of work, according to the latest stats from the federal government. And that builds this environment of fear, right. None of us have faced anything like this. This is much bigger and worse, at least this spike of it is, than the Great Recession of 2008. And, of course, all of these things contribute to lower spending across the board. 

However, what’s interesting about this moment in time is that it is a compressed moment. Right. It’s not a long-term fear of of what will happen. I think there’s fears about whether the recession will take a long time to recover from. But we know that eventually, sometime between 3 and 18 months from now, spending will resume and there will be this new normal. I think of now as a time when marketing needs to change its tone and attitude.

Businesses need to change their tone and attitude and in three ways. And that’s what I want to talk through. 

Three crucial points

1. Cut with a scalpel, not with a chainsaw

First off, as you are looking to save money and if you’re an agency, if you’re a consultant, your clients are almost certainly saying, “Hey, where can we pull back and still get returns on investment?” And I think one of the important points is not to cut with a chainsaw. Right. Not to take a big whack to, “Oh, let’s just look at all of our Google and Facebook ad spending and cut it out entirely.” Or “Let’s look at all of our content marketing investments and drop them completely.” That’s not probably not the right way to go. 

Instead, we should be looking to cut with a scalpel, and that means examining each channel and the individual contributors inside channels as individuals and looking at whether they are ROI-positive. I would urge against looking at a say, one-week, two-week, three-week trend. The last three weeks spending is very frozen and I believe that it will open up more again. I think most economists agree. You can see that’s why the the public stock markets have not crashed nearly as hard. We’ve had some bouncing around.

And I think that’s because people know that we will get to this point where people are ordering online. They are using businesses online. They are getting deliveries. They are doing activities through the Internet over the course of however long we’re quarantined or there is fear about going out and then it will return to a new normal. 

And so because of that, you should probably be looking something like six to twelve weeks in the past and trying to sort out, OK, where are the trends, where are their lifelines and opportunities and points of light? And let’s look at those ROI-positive channels and not cut them too soon. 

Likewise, you can look inside a channel. If you haven’t seen it already, I highly recommend Seer Interactive’s guide to cutting with a scalpel, not a sledgehammer, and they look at how you can analyze your Google Ads accounts to find keywords that are probably still sending you valuable traffic that you should not pull back on. I would also caution — I’ve talked to a bunch of folks recently who’s seen Facebook and Instagram and Twitter and YouTube and Google ad inventory at historically low prices. So if you have ROI-positive channels right now or your clients do, now is an awesome time to be to potentially be putting some dollars into that. 

2. Invest now for the second & third waves in the future

Second thing, I would invest now for the second and third waves. I think that’s a really smart way to go. You can look at Harvard Business Review and Bloomberg and a bunch of folks have written about investing during times of recession, times of fear, and seeing how. Basically when we when we go through wave one, which I think will be still another two to six weeks, of sort of nothing but virus-related news, nothing but COVID-19, and get to a point where we’re transitioning to this life online. It’s becoming our new every day. And then getting to a post-crisis new normal, you know, after we have robust testing and quarantining has hopefully worked out well. The hospital systems aren’t overwhelmed and maybe a vaccine as is near development or done.

When those things start to come, we will want to have now messaging and content and keyword demands serving. Right. And ads and webinars. Anything that is in our marketing inventory that can be helpful to people, not just during this time, but over the course of these, because if we make these investments now, we will be better set up than our competitors who are pulling back to execute on this. And that is what that research shows, right, that essentially folks who invest in marketing, in sales during a recession tend to outperform and more quickly outperform their competition as markets resume. You don’t even have to wait for them to get good — just as they start to pick up. 

3. Read the room

The third and possibly most important thing right now is, I think, to read the room. People are paying attention online like never before. And if you’re doing web marketing, they’re paying attention to your work. To our work. That means we need to be more empathetic than we have been historically, right? They are. Our audiences are not thinking about the same things they were weeks ago. They’re in a very new mindset. It doesn’t matter if they’re business-to-business or business-to-consumer. You are dealing with everyone on the planet basically obsessed with the conditions that we’re all in right now. That means assuming that everyone is thinking about this.



I really think the best type of content you create, the best type of marketing you can create right now across any channel, any platform is stuff that helps first. Helps other people. It could be in big ways. It could be in small ways. 

The Getty Museum, I don’t know if you saw Avinash Kaushik’s great post about the Getty Museum. They did this fun thing where they took pictures from their museum, famous paintings and they put them online and said, “Hey, go around your home and try and recreate these and we’ll post them.” Is it helping health care workers get masks? No. But is it helping people at home with their kids, with their families, with their loved ones have a little fun, take their mind off the crisis, engage with art in a way that maybe they can’t because they can’t go to museums right now? Yeah, that’s awesome. That’s fine. It’s okay to help in little ways, too, but help first. 

I also think it’s okay to talk about content or subjects that are not necessarily related to the virus. Look, web marketing right now is not directly related to the coronavirus. It’s not even directly related to some of the follow-on effects of that. But I’m hoping that it’s helpful. And I’m hoping that we can talk about it in empathetic and thoughtful ways. We’d just have to have to read the room. 

It is okay to recognize that this crisis is affecting your customers and to talk about things that aren’t directly related but are still useful to them. 

And if you can, I would try not to ignore this, right? Not not to create things that are completely unrelated, that feel like, “Gosh, this could have been launched at any time in the last six months, sort of feels tone deaf.” I think everything that we do is viewed through the lens of what’s happening right now. And certainly I have that experience as I go through online content. 

Do not dismiss the scenario. I think that that history will reflect very poorly. History is moving so fast right now that it is already reflecting poorly on people who are doing this. 

Don’t exploit the crisis in a shameless way. I’ve seen a few marketing companies and agencies. I won’t point them out because I don’t think shaming is the right thing to do right now, but show how you’re helping. Don’t exploit by saying “It’s coronavirus times. We have a sale.” All right? Say, “Oh, we are offering a discount on our products because we know that money is tight right now and we are helping this crisis by donating 10 percent of whatever.” Or, “We are helping by offering you something that you can do at home with your family or something that will help you with remote work or something that will help you through whatever you’re going through,” whatever your customers are going through. 

Don’t keep your tone and tactics the same right now. Oh, yes, I think that’s kind of madness as well. I would urge you, as you’re creating all this potentially good stuff, new stuff, stuff that plans for the future and that speaks to right now, go ahead and audit your marketing. Look at the e-mail newsletters you’re sending out. Look at the sequential emails that are in your site onboarding cycles. Look at the overlay messaging, look at your home page, look at your About page

Make sure that you’re either not ignoring the crisis or speaking effectively to it. Right. I don’t think every page on a website needs to change right now. I don’t think every marketing message has to change. But I think that in many cases it’s the right thing to do to conduct an audit and to make sure that you are not being insensitive or perceived as insincere. 

All right, everyone, I hope that you are staying safe, that you’re staying at home, that you’re washing your hands. And I promise you, together, we’re going to get through this.

Thanks. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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