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The West Blames the Wuhan Coronavirus on China’s Love of Eating Wild Animals. The Truth Is More Complex

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It was no secret to anyone in Wuhan that Huanan Seafood Market sold a lot more than its name suggested. While one side of the low-slung warren of stalls did primarily stock fish and shellfish, the other offered a cornucopia of spices, sundries and, if you knew where to look, beavers, porcupines and snakes.

“It was well-known for selling lots of weird, live animals,” says James, an English teacher who for five years lived a few hundred feet from the market, and who asks TIME to only use one name due to the sensitively of the situation. “So nobody was surprised at all when it emerged that the virus might have come from an unusual animal.”

Scientists have confirmed that the pneumonia-like disease, like around 70% of new human pathogens, was zoonotic or transmitted from an animal. But they are still investigating exactly what creature might be the source of the “novel coronavirus”—dubbed 2019-nCoV and belonging to the same family as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

As Wuhan coronavirus infection rates soar to more than 830 people across more than half a dozen nations—causing 26 deaths and leading to the unprecedented lockdown of 13 Chinese cities comprising more than 30 million people—researchers are examining China’s penchant for consuming wild animals and whether that ultimately played a role in the outbreak.

Noel Celis–AFP/GettyMembers of staff of the Wuhan Hygiene Emergency Response Team drive their vehicle as they leave the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in the city of Wuhan, in Hubei, Province on January 11, 2020, where the Wuhan health commission said that the man who died from a respiratory illness had purchased goods.

The 2002-2003 SARS pandemic was eventually traced to civet cats sold in a similar style of wet market in southern Guandong province, and some foreign tabloids are circulating unsubstantiated claims that the Wuhan coronavirus originated from everything from bat soup to eating rats and live wolf pups.

It’s certainly true that many Chinese are obsessive about freshness. Even small supermarkets commonly have fish tanks where shoppers can purchase live seafood. (This reporter was once served slices of sashimi still attached to the carcass of a gasping fish.) Eating wild animals is also considered a luxury because of their rarity and cost, much like game is in the West. Some practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine also believe that eating exotic creatures can cure certain ailments and boost “male potency.”

“This is just part of Chinese culture,” says Yanzhong Huang, a public heath expert at the Council for Foreign Relations. “They love to eat anything alive.”

Wild animals are, of course, especially problematic because their murky provenience makes it difficult to ensure they are free of disease. For this very reason, health campaigns in Africa warn people against the consumption of “bush meat,” which has been linked to the spread of countless diseases, including HIV/Aids.

However, Adam Kamradt-Scott, associate professor specializing in global health security at the University of Sydney, says this way of thinking is often flawed. While scientists first thought that Ebola started with the consumption of bat meat in a village of south-eastern Guinea, they now believe that the two-year-old girl known as Child Zero was likely infected via bat droppings that contaminated an object she put in her mouth. MERS was also primarily spread from live camels to humans through association, rather than the eating of camel meat.

“It’s not simply a matter of the consumption of exotic animals per se,” says Kamradt-Scott. “So we need to be mindful of picking on or condemning cultural practices.”

Ultimately, though, experts say that it’s hard to downplay the problematic nature of “wet markets” (so named because of the large quantities of water used to slosh the floors), especially those that also sell live animals. A mixture of urine, feces and other bodily fluids from live, wild creatures ends up mixing with blood from butchered animals, providing ideal opportunities for viruses and bacteria to thrive.

Says Huang: “As long as there are still wet markets, we will continue to see these outbreaks popping up.”





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‘Dangerous:’ Around the World, Police Chokeholds Are Being Scrutinized

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LE PECQ, France — Three days after George Floyd died with a Minneapolis police officer choking off his air, another black man writhed on the tarmac of a street in Paris as a police officer knelt on his neck during an arrest.

Immobilization techniques where officers apply pressure with their knees on prone suspects are used in policing around the world and have long drawn criticism. One reason why Floyd’s death is sparking anger and touching nerves globally is that such techniques have been blamed for asphyxiations and other deaths in police custody beyond American shores, often involving non-white suspects.

“We cannot say that the American situation is foreign to us,” said French lawmaker Francois Ruffin, who has pushed for a ban on the police use of face-down holds that are implicated in multiple deaths in France, a parliamentary effort put on hold by the coronavirus pandemic.

The muscular arrest on May 28 in Paris of a black man who was momentarily immobilized face-up with an officer’s knee and upper shin pressing down on his jaw, neck and upper chest is among those that have drawn angry comparisons with the killing of Floyd on May 25 in Minneapolis.

The Paris arrest was filmed by bystanders and widely shared and viewed online. Police said the man was driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol and without a license and that he resisted arrest and insulted officers. His case was turned over to prosecutors.

In Hong Kong, where police behavior is a hot-button issue after months of anti-government protests, the city’s force says it is investigating the death of a man who was immobilized face-down during his arrest in May by officers who were filmed kneeling on his shoulder, back and neck.

Police rules and procedures on chokeholds and restraints vary internationally.

In Belgium, police instructor Stany Durieux says he reprimands trainees, docking them points, “every time I see a knee applied to the spinal column.”

“It is also forbidden to lean on a suspect completely, as this can crush his rib cage and suffocate him,” he said.

Condemned by police and experts in the United States, Floyd’s death also drew criticism from officers abroad who disassociated themselves from the behavior of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. He was charged with third-degree murder after he was filmed pushing down with his knee on Floyd’s neck until Floyd stopped crying out that he couldn’t breathe and eventually stopped moving.

In Israel, police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said “there is no tactic or protocol that calls to put pressure on the neck or airway.”

In Germany, officers are allowed to briefly exert pressure on the side of a suspect’s head but not on the neck, says Germany‘s GdP police union.

In the U.K., the College of Policing says prone suspects should be placed on their side or in a sitting, kneeling or standing position “as soon as practicable.” Guidance on the website of London’s police force discourages the use of neck restraints, saying “any form of pressure to the neck area can be highly dangerous.”

Even within countries, procedures can vary.

The thick Patrol Guide, hundreds of pages long, for the New York Police Department says in bold capitals that officers “SHALL NOT” use chokeholds and should “avoid actions which may result in chest compression, such as sitting, kneeling, or standing on a subject’s chest or back, thereby reducing the subject’s ability to breathe.”

But the so-called “sleeper hold,” where pressure is applied to the neck with an arm, blocking blood flow, was allowed for police in San Diego before Floyd’s death triggered a shift. Police Chief David Nisleit said he would this week order an end to the tactic.

Gendarmes in France are discouraged from pressing down on the chests and vital organs of prone suspects and are no longer taught to apply pressure to the neck, said Col. Laurent De La Follye de Joux, head of training for the force.

“You don’t need to be a doctor to understand that it is dangerous,” he said.

But instructions for the National Police, the other main law and order force in France, appear to give its officers more leeway. Issued in 2015, they say pressure on a prone suspect’s chest “should be as short as possible.”

Christophe Rouget, a police union official who briefed lawmakers for their deliberations in March about the proposal to ban suffocating techniques, said if officers don’t draw pistols or use stun-guns then immobilizing people face-down is the safest option, stopping suspects from kicking out at arresting officers.

“We don’t have 5,000 options,” he said. “These techniques are used by all the police in the world because they represent the least amount of danger. The only thing is that they have to be well used. In the United States, we saw that it wasn’t well used, with pressure applied in the wrong place and for too long.”

He added that the “real problem” in France is that officers don’t get enough follow-up training after being taught restraints in police school.

“You need to repeat them often to do them well,” he said.





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The Public Safety LTE & 5G Market: 2020 – 2030 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies & Forecasts

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With the standardization of MCX (Mission-Critical PTT, Video & Data), IOPS (Isolated Operation for Public Safety), HPUE (High-Power User Equipment) and other critical communications features by the 3GPP, LTE and 5G NR (New Radio) networks are increasingly gaining recognition as an all-inclusive public safety communications platform for the delivery of real-time video, high-resolution imagery, multimedia messaging, mobile office/field data applications, location services and mapping, situational awareness, unmanned asset control and other broadband capabilities, as well as MCPTT (Mission-Critical PTT) voice and narrowband data services provided by traditional LMR (Land Mobile Radio) systems.Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05903652/?utm_source=PRN A myriad of dedicated, hybrid commercial-private and MVNO-based public safety LTE and 5G-ready networks are operational or in the process of being rolled out throughout the globe. In addition to the high-profile FirstNet, South Korea's Safe-Net and Britain's ESN nationwide public safety broadband projects, many additional national-level engagements have recently come to light – most notably, the Royal Thai Police's LTE network which is already operational in the greater Bangkok region, Finland's VIRVE 2.0 mission-critical mobile broadband service, France's PCSTORM critical communications broadband project, and Russia's secure 450 MHz LTE network for police forces, emergency services and the national guard.Other operational and pilot deployments range from nationwide systems in the oil-rich GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) region to local and city-level private LTE networks for first responders in markets as diverse as Canada, China, Laos, Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Lebanon, Egypt, Kenya, Ghana, Cote D'Ivoire, Cameroon, Mali, Madagascar, Mauritius, Canary Islands, Spain, Italy, Serbia, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and Trinidad & Tobago, as well as multi-domain critical communications broadband networks such as Nordic Telecom in the Czech Republic and MRC's (Mobile Radio Center) LTE-based advanced MCA digital radio system in Japan, and secure MVNO platforms in countries including but not limited to Mexico, Belgium, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Slovenia and Estonia.In addition, even though critical public safety-related 5G NR capabilities are yet to be standardized as part of the 3GPP's Release 17 specifications, public safety agencies have already begun experimenting with 5G for applications that can benefit from the technology's high-bandwidth and low-latency characteristics. For example, New Zealand Police are utilizing mobile operator Vodafone's 5G NR network to share real-time UHD (Ultra High Definition) video feeds from cellular-equipped drones and police cruisers with officers on the ground and command posts. In the near future, we also expect to see rollouts of localized 5G NR systems for incident scene management and related use cases, potentially using up to 50 MHz of Band n79 spectrum in the 4.9 GHz frequency range (4,940-4,990 MHz) which has been designated for public safety use in multiple countries including but not limited to the United States, Canada, Australia, Malaysia and Qatar.The analyst estimates that annual investments in public safety LTE/5G-ready infrastructure will surpass $2 Billion by the end of 2020, predominantly driven by new build-outs and the expansion of existing dedicated and hybrid commercial-private networks in a variety of licensed bands across 420/450 MHz, 700 MHz, 800 MHz, 1.4 GHz and higher frequencies, in addition to secure MVNO networks for critical communications. Complemented by a rapidly expanding ecosystem of public safety-grade LTE/5G devices, the market will further grow at a CAGR of approximately 10% between 2020 and 2023, eventually accounting for more than $3 Billion by the end of 2023.The "Public Safety LTE & 5G Market: 2020 – 2030 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies & Forecasts" report presents an in-depth assessment of the public safety LTE/5G market including market drivers, challenges, enabling technologies, application scenarios, use cases, operational models, key trends, standardization, spectrum availability/allocation, regulatory landscape, case studies, opportunities, future roadmap, value chain, ecosystem player profiles and strategies. The report also presents global and regional market size forecasts from 2020 till 2030, covering public safety LTE/5G infrastructure, terminal equipment, applications, systems integration and management solutions, as well as subscriptions and service revenue.The report comes with an associated Excel datasheet suite covering quantitative data from all numeric forecasts presented in the report, as well as a list and associated details of over 500 global public safety LTE/5G engagements – as of Q2'2020.Topics CoveredThe report covers the following topics:- Public safety LTE and 5G ecosystem- Market drivers and barriers- System architecture and key elements of public safety LTE and 5G systems- Analysis of public safety broadband application scenarios and use cases – ranging from mission-critical group communications and real-time video transmission to 5G era applications centered upon UHD (Ultra High Definition Video), AR/VR/MR (Augmented, Virtual & Mixed Reality), drones and robotics- Operational models for public safety LTE and 5G networks including commercial, independent, managed, shared core, hybrid commercial-private and secure MVNO networks- PPPs (Public-Private Partnerships) and other common approaches to financing and delivering dedicated public safety LTE and 5G networks- MCX (Mission-Critical PTT, Video & Data), IOPS (Isolated Operation for Public Safety), deployable LTE/5G systems, ProSe (Proximity Services) for D2D (Device-to-Device) communications, HPUE (High Power User Equipment), QPP (QoS, Priority & Preemption), network slicing, end-to-end security, high-precision positioning, 3GPP access over satellite/NTN (Non-Terrestrial Networking) platforms and other enabling technologies- Key trends including hybrid RAN (Radio Access Network) implementations for nationwide public safety broadband networks, local and city-level LTE deployments to support police forces in developing countries, adoption of sub-500 MHz spectrum for mission-critical LTE networks, commercial readiness of 3GPP-compliant MCX functionality, LMR-based interim solutions for off-network communications, secure MVNO solutions with cross-border roaming, mobile operator-branded critical communications broadband platforms, 5G NR connectivity for applications requiring higher data rates and lower latencies, and localized 5G NR networks for incident scene management- Review of public safety LTE/5G engagements worldwide including a detailed assessment of 10 nationwide public safety broadband projects and additional case studies of over 40 dedicated, hybrid, MVNO and commercial operator-supplied systems- Spectrum availability, allocation and usage for public safety LTE and 5G networks across the global, regional and national regulatory domains- Standardization, regulatory and collaborative initiatives- Future roadmap and value chain- Profiles and strategies of 1,100 ecosystem players including LTE/5G equipment suppliers and public safety-domain specialists- Strategic recommendations for public safety and government agencies, LTE/5G infrastructure, device and chipset suppliers, LMR vendors, system integrators, and commercial/private mobile operators- Market analysis and forecasts from 2020 till 2030Forecast SegmentationMarket forecasts are provided for each of the following submarkets and their subcategories:Public Safety LTE & 5G Network InfrastructureSubmarkets- RAN (Radio Access Network)- Mobile Core- Backhaul & TransportTechnology Generations- LTE- 5G NRRAN Base Station (eNB/gNB) Cell Sizes- Macrocells- Small CellsRAN Base Station (eNB/gNB) Mobility Categories- Fixed Base Stations- Deployable Base StationsDeployable RAN Base Station (eNB/gNB) Form Factors- NIB (Network-in-a-Box)- Vehicular COWs (Cells-on-Wheels)- Aerial Cell Sites- Maritime PlatformsBackhaul & Transport Network Transmission Mediums- Fiber & Wireline- Microwave- SatellitePublic Safety LTE & 5G Terminal EquipmentTechnology Generations- LTE- 5G NRForm Factors- Smartphones & Handportable Terminals- Mobile & Vehicular Routers- Fixed CPEs (Customer Premises Equipment)- Tablets & Notebook PCs- Smart Wearables- IoT Modules, Dongles & OthersPublic Safety LTE & 5G Subscriptions/Service RevenueTechnology Generations- LTE- 5G NRNetwork Types- Dedicated & Hybrid Commercial-Private Networks- Secure MVNO Networks- Commercial Mobile NetworksPublic Safety LTE & 5G Systems Integration & Management SolutionsSubmarkets- Network Integration & Testing- Device Management & User Services- Managed Services, Operations & Maintenance- CybersecurityPublic Safety Broadband ApplicationsSubmarkets- Mission-Critical Voice & Group Communications- Real-Time Video Transmission- Messaging, File Transfer & Presence Services- Mobile Office & Field Applications- Location Services & Mapping- Situational Awareness- Command & Control- AR/VR/MR (Augmented, Virtual & Mixed Reality)Regional Markets- North America- Asia Pacific- Europe- Middle East & Africa- Latin & Central AmericaKey Questions AnsweredThe report provides answers to the following key questions:- How big is the public safety LTE and 5G opportunity?- What trends, drivers and barriers are influencing its growth?- How is the ecosystem evolving by segment and region?- What will the market size be in 2023, and at what rate will it grow?- Which regions and submarkets will see the highest percentage of growth?- What is the status of dedicated, hybrid commercial-private and secure MVNO-based public safety broadband networks worldwide?- What are the key application scenarios and use cases of LTE and 5G for first responders?- When will FirstNet, Safe-Net, ESN and other nationwide public safety broadband networks replace existing digital LMR systems?- What opportunities exist for commercial mobile operators and critical communications service providers?- What are the future prospects of NIB (Network-in-a-Box), COWs (Cell-on-Wheels), drone-mounted aerial cells and other rapidly deployable LTE and 5G NR systems?- How does standardization impact the adoption of LTE and 5G for public safety communications?- When will MCX, IOPS, ProSe, HPUE and other 3GPP-defined critical communications features be widely employed in public safety broadband networks?- How will network slicing provide dynamic QoS guarantees and isolation for public safety applications in 5G networks?- What are the existing and candidate frequency bands for the operation of public safety broadband networks?- How can public safety stakeholders leverage excess spectrum capacity to ensure the economic viability of dedicated LTE and LTE networks?- Who are the key ecosystem players, and what are their strategies?- What strategies should LTE/5G infrastructure suppliers, LMR vendors, system integrators and mobile operators adopt to remain competitive?Key FindingsThe report has the following key findings:- The analyst estimates that annual investments in public safety LTE/5G-ready infrastructure will surpass $2 Billion by the end of 2020, predominantly driven by new build-outs and the expansion of existing dedicated and hybrid commercial-private networks in addition to secure MVNO networks for critical communications. Complemented by a rapidly expanding ecosystem of public safety-grade LTE/5G devices, the market will further grow at a CAGR of approximately 10% between 2020 and 2023, eventually accounting for more than $3 Billion by the end of 2023.- Public safety LTE networks are playing an integral role in ongoing response efforts to combat the global COVID-19 pandemic. For example, in the United States, the FirstNet communications platform is being leveraged to deliver prioritized voice, data, video and location services for first responders and medical personnel – including mobile telehealth applications to facilitate remote screening and monitoring, as well as temporary coverage and capacity expansion for pop-up testing sites, quarantine centers and healthcare facilities using rapidly deployable cellular assets and in-building wireless systems.- In addition to the high-profile FirstNet, South Korea's Safe-Net and Britain's ESN nationwide public safety broadband projects, many additional national-level engagements have recently come to light – most notably, the Royal Thai Police's LTE network which is already operational in the greater Bangkok region, Finland's VIRVE 2.0 mission-critical mobile broadband service, France's PCSTORM critical communications broadband project, and Russia's secure 450 MHz LTE network for police forces, emergency services and the national guard.- Other operational and pilot deployments range from nationwide systems in the oil-rich GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) region to local and city-level private LTE networks for first responders in markets as diverse as Canada, China, Laos, Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Lebanon, Egypt, Kenya, Ghana, Cote D'Ivoire, Cameroon, Mali, Madagascar, Mauritius, Canary Islands, Spain, Italy, Serbia, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and Trinidad & Tobago, as well as multi-domain critical communications broadband networks such as Nordic Telecom in the Czech Republic and MRC's (Mobile Radio Center) LTE-based advanced MCA digital radio system in Japan, and secure MVNO platforms in countries including but not limited to Mexico, Belgium, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Slovenia and Estonia.- Although the aforementioned references to several developing economies in the list of early adopters may come as a surprise, the lack of well-established digital LMR systems in many of these countries makes it possible to leapfrog directly from ageing analog technologies to LTE-based critical communications networks for both voice and broadband services, without the complex and time-consuming challenges associated with transitioning from large-scale and nationwide digital LMR networks.- In much of the developed world, digital LMR networks are unlikely to be fully replaced by LTE and 5G until the late 2020s to early 2030s, especially in markets where large-scale systems have been rolled out or upgraded recently – for example, Germany's BDBOS, Norway's Nodnett and the Netherlands' C2000 TETRA networks.- Leveraging their extensive LTE/5G NR-capable cellular infrastructure assets and technical expertise, mobile operators have managed to establish a foothold in the public safety broadband market – with active involvement in some of the largest public safety LTE/5G engagements using both commercial and dedicated public safety spectrum.- Dozens of vendors have already developed both client and application server implementations that are compliant with 3GPP's MCPTT, MCVideo and MCData specifications. Frontrunner customers – for example, South Korea's National Police Agency – have already begun transitioning to 3GPP-compliant MCX functionality, and we expect to see larger production-grade rollouts of the technology – beginning with MCPTT – in 2020.- Due to the commercial immaturity of 3GPP-specified ProSe (Proximity Services) functionality, a number of interim solutions are being employed to fulfill direct mode, off-network communications requirements. These range from hybrid TETRA/P25-LTE capable terminals to LMR-based RSMs (Remote Speaker Microphones) and detachable accessories that attach to existing LTE devices to facilitate D2D communications over a sufficient coverage radius.- Even though critical public safety-related 5G NR capabilities are yet to be standardized as part of the 3GPP's Release 17 specifications, public safety agencies have already begun experimenting with 5G for applications that can benefit from the technology's high-bandwidth and low-latency characteristics. For example, New Zealand Police are utilizing mobile operator Vodafone's 5G NR network to share real-time UHD (Ultra High Definition) video feeds from cellular-equipped drones and police cruisers with officers on the ground and command posts.- In the near future, we also expect to see rollouts of localized 5G NR systems for incident scene management and related use cases, potentially using up to 50 MHz of Band n79 spectrum in the 4.9 GHz frequency range (4,940-4,990 MHz) which has been designated for public safety use in multiple countries including but not limited to the United States, Canada, Australia, Malaysia and Qatar.- As public safety-grade 5G implementations become well-established in the 2020s, real-time UHD video transmission through coordinated fleets of drones, 5G-equipped autonomous police robots, smart ambulances, AR (Augmented Reality) firefighting helmets and other sophisticated public safety broadband applications will become a common sight.Companies Mentioned• Afghanistan• Albania• Algeria• Andorra• Angola• Anguilla• Antigua & Barbuda• Argentina• Armenia• Aruba• Australia• Austria• Azerbaijan• Bahamas• Bahrain• Bangladesh• Barbados• Belarus• Belgium• Belize• Benin• Bermuda• Bhutan• Bolivia• Bosnia Herzegovina• Botswana• Brazil• British Virgin Islands• Brunei• Bulgaria• Burkina Faso• Burundi• Cambodia• Cameroon• Canada• Cape Verde• Cayman Islands• Central African Republic• Chad• Chile• China• Cocos Islands• Colombia• Comoros Islands• Congo• Cook Islands• Costa Rica• Côte d'Ivoire• Croatia• Cuba• Cyprus• Czech Republic• Democratic Rep of Congo (ex-Zaire)• Denmark• Djibouti• Dominica• Dominican Republic• East Timor• Ecuador• Egypt• El Salvador• Equatorial Guinea• Eritrea• Estonia• Ethiopia• Faroe Islands• Federated States of Micronesia• Fiji• Finland• France• French Guiana• French Polynesia (ex-Tahiti)• French West Indies• Gabon• Gambia• Georgia• Germany• Ghana• Gibraltar• Greece• Greenland• Grenada• Guam• Guatemala• Guernsey• Guinea Republic• Guinea-Bissau• Guyana• Haiti• Honduras• Hong Kong• Hungary• Iceland• India• Indonesia• Iran• Iraq• Ireland• Isle of Man• Israel• Italy• Jamaica• Japan• Jersey• Jordan• Kazakhstan• Kenya• Kirghizstan• Kiribati• Korea• Kosovo• Kuwait• Laos• Latvia• Lebanon• Lesotho• Liberia• Libya• Liechtenstein• Lithuania• Luxembourg• Macau• Macedonia• Madagascar• Malawi• Malaysia• Maldives• Mali• Malta• Marshall Islands• Mauritania• Mauritius• Mayotte• Mexico• Moldova• Monaco• Mongolia• Montenegro• Montserrat• Morocco• Mozambique• Myanmar• Namibia• Nepal• Netherlands• Netherlands Antilles• New Caledonia• New Zealand• Nicaragua• Niger• Nigeria• Niue• North Korea• Northern Marianas• Norway• Oman• Pakistan• Palau• Palestine• Panama• Papua New Guinea• Paraguay• Peru• Philippines• Poland• Portugal• Puerto Rico• Qatar• Réunion• Romania• Russia• Rwanda• Samoa• Samoa (American)• Sao Tomé & Principe• Saudi Arabia• Senegal• Serbia• Seychelles• Sierra Leone• Singapore• Slovak Republic• Slovenia• Solomon Islands• Somalia• South Africa• Spain• Sri Lanka• St Kitts & Nevis• St Lucia• St Vincent & The Grenadines• Sudan• Suriname• Swaziland• Sweden• Switzerland• Syria• Tajikistan• Taiwan• Tanzania• Thailand• Togo• Tonga• Trinidad & Tobago• Tunisia• Turkey• Turkmenistan• Turks & Caicos Islands• UAE• Uganda• UK• Ukraine• Uruguay• US Virgin Islands• USA• Uzbekistan• Vanuatu• Venezuela• Vietnam• Yemen• Zambia• ZimbabweRead the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05903652/?utm_source=PRN About Reportlinker ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need – instantly, in one place. __________________________ Contact Clare: clare@reportlinker.com US: (339)-368-6001 Intl: +1 339-368-6001



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Thousand Defy Ban in Paris to Protest as George Floyd Outrage Goes Global

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PARIS — Tear gas choked Paris streets as riot police faced off with protesters setting fires Tuesday amid growing global outrage over George Floyd’s death in the United States, racial injustice and heavy-handed police tactics around the world.

French protesters took a knee and raised their fists while firefighters struggled to extinguish multiple blazes as a largely peaceful, multiracial demonstration degenerated into scattered tensions. Several thousand people defied a virus-related ban on protests to pay homage to Floyd and Adama Traore, a French black man who died in police custody.

Electric scooters and construction barriers went up in flames, and smoke stained a sign reading “Restaurant Open” — on the first day French cafes were allowed to open after nearly three months of virus lockdown.

Chanting “I can’t breathe,” thousands marched peacefully through Australia’s largest city, while thousands more demonstrated in the Dutch capital of The Hague and hundreds rallied in Tel Aviv. Expressions of anger erupted in multiple languages on social networks, with thousands of Swedes joining an online protest and others speaking out under the banner of #BlackOutTuesday.

Diplomatic ire percolated too, with the European Union’s top foreign policy official saying the bloc was “shocked and appalled” by Floyd’s death.

Floyd died last week after a police officer pressed his knee into his neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. The death set off protests that spread across America — and now, beyond.

As demonstrations escalated worldwide, solidarity with U.S. protesters increasingly mixed with local worries.

“This happened in the United States, but it happens in France, it happens everywhere,” Paris protester Xavier Dintimille said. While he said police violence seems worse in the U.S., he added, “all blacks live this to a degree.”

Fears of the coronavirus remain close to the surface and were the reason cited for banning Tuesday’s protest at the main Paris courthouse, because gatherings of more than 10 people remain forbidden.

But demonstrators showed up anyway. Some said police violence worsened during virus confinement in working class suburbs with large minority populations, deepening a feeling of injustice.

As the Paris demonstration wound down, police fired volley after volley of tear gas and protesters threw debris. Police were less visible than usual at the city’s frequent protests. Tensions also erupted at a related protest in the southern city of Marseille.

The demonstrations were held in honor of Traore, who died shortly after his arrest in 2016, and in solidarity with Americans demonstrating against Floyd’s death.

The Traore case has become emblematic of the fight against police brutality in France. The circumstances of the death of the 24-year-old Frenchman of Malian origin are still under investigation after four years of conflicting medical reports about what happened.

The lawyer for two of the three police officers involved in the arrest, Rodolphe Bosselut, said the Floyd and Traore cases “have strictly nothing to do with each other.” Bosselut told The Associated Press that Traore’s death wasn’t linked with the conditions of his arrest but other factors, including a preexisting medical condition.

Traore’s family says he died from asphyxiation because of police tactics — and that his last words were “I can’t breathe.”

“I can’t breathe” were also the final words of David Dungay, a 26-year-old Aboriginal man who died in a Sydney prison in 2015 while being restrained by five guards.

As 3,000 people marched peacefully through Sydney, many said they had been inspired by a mixture of sympathy for African Americans and to call for change in Australia’s treatment of its indigenous population, particularly involving police. The mostly Australian crowd at the authorized demonstration also included protesters from the U.S. and elsewhere.

“I’m here for my people, and for our fallen brothers and sisters around the world,” said Sydney indigenous woman Amanda Hill, 46, who attended the rally with her daughter and two nieces. “What’s happening in America shines a light on the situation here.”

Even as U.S. President Donald Trump fanned anger by threatening to send in troops on American protesters, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau refrained from directly criticizing him and said the protests should force awareness of racism everywhere.

“We all watch in horror and consternation what’s going on in the United States,” he said after pausing 21 seconds before answering. “But it is a time for us as Canadians to recognize that we, too, have our challenges, that black Canadians and racialized Canadians face discrimination as a lived reality every single day. There is systemic discrimination in Canada.”

More protests in various countries are planned later in the week, including a string of demonstrations in front of U.S. embassies on Saturday.

The drama unfolding in the U.S. drew increasing diplomatic concern.

EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell’s remarks in Brussels were the strongest to come out of the 27-nation bloc, saying Floyd’s death was a result of an abuse of power.

Borrell told reporters that “like the people of the United States, we are shocked and appalled by the death of George Floyd.” He underlined that Europeans “support the right to peaceful protest, and also we condemn violence and racism of any kind, and for sure, we call for a de-escalation of tensions.”

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said peaceful protests in the U.S. following Floyd’s death are “understandable and more than legitimate.”

“I can only express my hope that the peaceful protests do not continue to lead to violence, but even more express the hope that these protests have an effect in the United States,” Maas said.

More African leaders are speaking up over the killing of Floyd.

“It cannot be right that, in the 21st century, the United States, this great bastion of democracy, continues to grapple with the problem of systemic racism,” Ghana President Nana Akufo-Addo said in a statement, adding that black people the world over are shocked and distraught.

Kenyan opposition leader and former Prime Minister Raila Odinga offered a prayer for the U.S., “that there be justice and freedom for all human beings who call America their country.”

Like some in Africa who have spoken out, Odinga also noted troubles at home, saying the judging of people by character instead of skin color “is a dream we in Africa, too, owe our citizens.”

___

Associated Press writers Rick Rycroft in Sydney, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia, Lori Hinnant in Paris, Aritz Parra in Madrid, Frank Jordans in Berlin, Lorne Cook in Brussels, Peter Dejong in The Hague contributed.





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